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I was given a simple python program to analyze. It works fine, and outputs 13, 14, and 15 randomly (of course). I can see why 13 and 14 where printed, but I don't understand where 15 came from.

Please explain.

from threading import Thread
import random
import time
import sys

def rwait():
    amt = random.uniform(0.01,0.1)
    time.sleep(amt)

x = 0

key = True

def lockx():
    global key
    while not key:
        time.sleep(0)
    rwait()
    key = False

def unlockx():
    global key
    key = True

def A():
    global x
    rwait()
    lockx()
    reg = x
    reg = reg+1
    rwait()
    x = reg
    unlockx()

def B():
    global x
    rwait()
    lockx()
    reg = x
    reg = reg+2
    rwait()
    x = reg
    unlockx()

def main():
    global x
    x = 12
    p1 = Thread(target=B)
    p1.start()
    A()
    p1.join()
    print("x=",x)


for k in range(20):
    main()
share|improve this question
1  
What exactly do you think your program is doing? –  Michael Foukarakis Nov 1 '13 at 11:48
    
@MichaelFoukarakis running def A() and def B() simultaneously and adding 1 or 2 to 12, depending on the defining process. I am a novice at python, especially multithreading. –  trama Nov 1 '13 at 11:51
    
Running A() and B() in parallel is generally not guaranteed with threads -- threads alone provide concurrency but not parallelism. If you want to modify x by exclusively 1 or 2, you need to alter your code. –  Michael Foukarakis Nov 1 '13 at 12:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Three different things can happen:

  • thread A and B read x before it is changed, then

    • thread A writes its result (13), and

    • thread B writes its result (14),

    and the second thread to write wins.

  • thread A or B reads x first, and writes before the other thread reads. Result: 15, as either A reads 12, adds one and writes 13, then B reads 13 and writes 15, or vice-versa.

share|improve this answer

Your function names seem to imply they're performing locking, which they are not. This is for two reasons:

  • Accesses to key are not guaranteed atomicity.
  • Even if they were, there is a race between the time key is read and its value is True, and the time it is used and set to False.

As a result, your two threads end up modifying shared (global, in this case) state in an unsynchronised fashion. Therefore, any of three scenarios are possible:

  1. x is only incremented by 1 - B has executed wholly after x was read by A but before the incremented value was stored back.
  2. x is only incremented by 2 - same scenario as above with A and B reversed.
  3. x is incremented by 3 - A or B executes wholly before B or A, respectively.

To correctly synchronise two threads, you have to use locking. Here's an adaptation of your code, using the facilities provided by Threading:

from threading import Thread, Lock

x = 0

lock = Lock()

def lockx():
    global lock
    lock.acquire()

def unlockx():
    global lock
    lock.release()

def A():
    global x
    lockx()
    reg = x
    reg = reg+1
    x = reg
    unlockx()

def B():
    global x
    lockx()
    reg = x
    reg = reg+2
    x = reg
    unlockx()

def main():
    global x
    x = 12
    p1 = Thread(target=B)
    p1.start()
    A()
    p1.join()
    print("x=",x)

for k in range(20):
    main()
share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty sure using the Threading stuff is out of the scope of what the OP tries to achieve: Create a locking mechanism himself. –  Alfe Nov 1 '13 at 12:04
    
My old, senile professor (who looks like Santa Clause, which makes him cool in my book) wrote this... –  trama Nov 1 '13 at 12:05
    
@Alfe: the OP states they are analysing a piece of code, rather than trying to implement either locking or synchronisation. –  Michael Foukarakis Nov 1 '13 at 12:06
    
Note: the global lock lines are redundant; you are not assigning to the lock name in the functions, so it is already a global. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 1 '13 at 12:13
    
@MartijnPieters: True, but I prefer to be explicit. –  Michael Foukarakis Nov 1 '13 at 12:15

You have demonstrated a classical concurrency problem here. Two writers act at the same time, thus potentially overwrite the data written by the other.

If you receive 13, then the thread A reads before thread B has written its result and A writes after B has written its result.

If you receive 14, then the thread B reads before thread A has written its result and B writes after A has written its result.

If you receive 15, then one thread reads (and computes and writes) after the other thread has written its result. The order of both threads cannot be determined then.

The more intriguing question is, however, why the locking mechanism (lockx/unlockx) obviously does not work. Would it work, you'd always get 15 as a result.

share|improve this answer
1  
The locking mechanism makes no attempt whatsoever to be atomic, hence the two threads may very well lock at the same time. Also, it doesn't have a lock count, so when you do get two threads locking, it get's unlocked as soon as one thread unlocks it. Even worse, there is a random wait between checking if it is locked, and locking. It almost guarantees that all threads thinking they have the lock at the same time. –  Lennart Regebro Nov 1 '13 at 12:11
    
Yep. I just wanted to point out that only 15 should be the answer, assuming that an established locking was present, but that this locking wasn't working properly. Your explanation surely found the true reason in the missing atomicity of the used locking. –  Alfe Nov 1 '13 at 12:58

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