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This first example works,

public interface IFoo 
{
    int DoThing(int request);
}

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    public int DoThing(int a) 
    {
        return 1;
    }
}

public class FooFactory<TResult, TRequest>
{
    public IFoo Create() 
    {
        return new Foo();
    }
}

but this second generics example does not work

public interface IFoo<TResult, TRequest> 
{
    TResult DoThing(TRequest request);
}

public class Foo : IFoo<int, int>
{
    public int DoThing(int a) 
    {
        return 1;
    }
}

public class FooFactory<TResult, TRequest>
{
    public IFoo<TResult, TRequest> Create() 
    {
        return new Foo();
    }
}

giving the error:

Cannot implicitly convert type Foo to IFoo<TResult, TRequest>

In the first example, Foo has the behaviour of IFoo so all is good, but doesn't Foo exhibit the behaviour of the generic IFoo in the second example also??

share|improve this question
    
If this worked, imagine the following code: var a = new FooFactory<string, string>(); var b = a.Create(); Because a is FooFactory<string, string>, the type of b is the return type of Create, which is IFoo<string, string>, but the function would actually return IFoo<int, int>. What you can do is return (IFoo<TResult, TRequest>) new Foo();, which will then compile and throw a run time invalid cast exception if you use it improperly like in my example. Generally, you don't want to do this, as you want type mismatches to be caught at compile time. –  svinja Nov 1 '13 at 12:05
    
Is this for C#? Please add language tag to your question –  Bohemian Nov 1 '13 at 13:10
    
This is for C#, how do I go about creating a FooFactory where the return type is not known? So Create may be returning an IFoo<int, int> or an IFoo<string, string> - this is why the return type was IFoo<TResult, TRequest> –  user1054637 Nov 1 '13 at 13:46

1 Answer 1

In the second example you return a new Foo() which is of the type IFoo<int,int> but the method declaration says that you should return a IFoo<TResult,TRequest>.

So if you instead did like this:

public class FooFactory
{
    public IFoo<int, int> Create() 
    {
        return new Foo();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok so how do I go about creating a FooFactory where the return type is not known? So Create may be returning an IFoo<int, int> or an IFoo<string, string> - this is why the return type was IFoo<TResult, TRequest> –  user1054637 Nov 1 '13 at 13:29
    
That is not really the intention of generics, that is what you use inheritance for. But you can introduce one more layer of indirection which does the actually creating. But from what you describe I would say you take look at the pattern AbstractFactory: dofactory.com/Patterns/PatternAbstract.aspx. –  giZm0 Nov 2 '13 at 9:16

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