Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

The big problem I am trying to solve is identify why in one of our managed application we are receiving from time to time a access violation exception (0xc0000005). Recently, on a completely different application we started to receive a NullReference exception (which is a know bug now), but it's followed by a (0xc0000005) error. I wonder if this is normal behaviour or it is related to our 'big problem'.

Access violation exception (2nd)

Faulting application name: Marketform.Ultimates.Client.exe, version: 0.27.0.0, time stamp: 0x52728ad4
Faulting module name: unknown, version: 0.0.0.0, time stamp: 0x00000000
Exception code: 0xc0000005
Fault offset: 0x08cac78a
Faulting process id: 0x10f4
Faulting application start time: 0x01ced7016881cca1
Faulting application path: C:\Users\vxk\AppData\Local\Apps\2.0\WZ2LJT6T.PKK\WEJ4X8PL.17E\mark..tion_5585060aa30c4020_0000.001e_06d3070c7f40068c\Marketform.Ultimates.Client.exe
Faulting module path: unknown
Report Id: b7d08351-42f4-11e3-802a-005056b87be9

NullReference exception (1st)

Application: Marketform.Ultimates.Client.exe
Framework Version: v4.0.30319
Description: The process was terminated due to an unhandled exception.
Exception Info: System.NullReferenceException
Stack:
   at Marketform.Ultimates.Module.ViewModels.UltimatePremiumViewModel.CanSave()
   at Microsoft.Practices.Prism.Commands.DelegateCommand+<>c__DisplayClass6.<.ctor>b__3(System.Object)
   at Microsoft.Practices.Prism.Commands.DelegateCommandBase.CanExecute(System.Object)
   at Microsoft.Practices.Prism.Commands.DelegateCommandBase.System.Windows.Input.ICommand.CanExecute(System.Object)
   at Marketform.Ultimates.Module.DelegateCommandWrapper.CanExecute(System.Object)
   at MS.Internal.Commands.CommandHelpers.CanExecuteCommandSource(System.Windows.Input.ICommandSource)
   at System.Windows.Controls.Primitives.ButtonBase.UpdateCanExecute()
   at System.Windows.Controls.Primitives.ButtonBase.HookCommand(System.Windows.Input.ICommand)
   at System.Windows.Controls.Primitives.ButtonBase.OnCommandChanged(System.Windows.DependencyObject, System.Windows.DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs)
   at System.Windows.DependencyObject.OnPropertyChanged(System.Windows.DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs)
   at System.Windows.FrameworkElement.OnPropertyChanged(System.Windows.DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs)
   at System.Windows.DependencyObject.NotifyPropertyChange(System.Windows.DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs)
   at System.Windows.DependencyObject.UpdateEffectiveValue(System.Windows.EntryIndex, System.Windows.DependencyProperty, System.Windows.PropertyMetadata, System.Windows.EffectiveValueEntry, System.Windows.EffectiveValueEntry ByRef, Boolean, Boolean, System.Windows.OperationType)
   at System.Windows.DependencyObject.InvalidateProperty(System.Windows.DependencyProperty)
   at System.Windows.Data.BindingExpressionBase.Invalidate(Boolean)
   at System.Windows.Data.BindingExpression.TransferValue(System.Object, Boolean)
   at System.Windows.Data.BindingExpression.Activate(System.Object)
   at System.Windows.Data.BindingExpression.AttachToContext(AttachAttempt)
   at System.Windows.Data.BindingExpression.MS.Internal.Data.IDataBindEngineClient.AttachToContext(Boolean)
   at MS.Internal.Data.DataBindEngine+Task.Run(Boolean)
   at MS.Internal.Data.DataBindEngine.Run(System.Object)
   at System.Windows.Threading.ExceptionWrapper.InternalRealCall(System.Delegate, System.Object, Int32)
   at MS.Internal.Threading.ExceptionFilterHelper.TryCatchWhen(System.Object, System.Delegate, System.Object, Int32, System.Delegate)
   at System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherOperation.InvokeImpl()
   at System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherOperation.InvokeInSecurityContext(System.Object)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.runTryCode(System.Object)
   at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeHelpers.ExecuteCodeWithGuaranteedCleanup(TryCode, CleanupCode, System.Object)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.RunInternal(System.Threading.ExecutionContext, System.Threading.ContextCallback, System.Object)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(System.Threading.ExecutionContext, System.Threading.ContextCallback, System.Object, Boolean)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(System.Threading.ExecutionContext, System.Threading.ContextCallback, System.Object)
   at System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherOperation.Invoke()
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.ProcessQueue()
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.WndProcHook(IntPtr, Int32, IntPtr, IntPtr, Boolean ByRef)
   at MS.Win32.HwndWrapper.WndProc(IntPtr, Int32, IntPtr, IntPtr, Boolean ByRef)
   at MS.Win32.HwndSubclass.DispatcherCallbackOperation(System.Object)
   at System.Windows.Threading.ExceptionWrapper.InternalRealCall(System.Delegate, System.Object, Int32)
   at MS.Internal.Threading.ExceptionFilterHelper.TryCatchWhen(System.Object, System.Delegate, System.Object, Int32, System.Delegate)
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.InvokeImpl(System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherPriority, System.TimeSpan, System.Delegate, System.Object, Int32)
   at MS.Win32.HwndSubclass.SubclassWndProc(IntPtr, Int32, IntPtr, IntPtr)
   at MS.Win32.UnsafeNativeMethods.DispatchMessage(System.Windows.Interop.MSG ByRef)
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.PushFrameImpl(System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherFrame)
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.PushFrame(System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherFrame)
   at System.Windows.Application.RunDispatcher(System.Object)
   at System.Windows.Application.RunInternal(System.Windows.Window)
   at System.Windows.Application.Run(System.Windows.Window)
   at Marketform.Ultimates.Client.App.Main()
share|improve this question
    
Sounds like some P/Invoke has gone wrong. Sometimes because you've passed a callback delegate or reference to a buffer that's using something that's been garbage-collected... is that a possibility? –  Matthew Watson Nov 1 '13 at 13:36
    
In the first app possibly. However the 2nd doesn't reference any unmanaged code and doesn't do any unsafe calls, that why it made confused why it is also received access violation error. –  Vitalij Nov 1 '13 at 14:10
    
Yeah, you shouldn't get such errors if it's all unmanaged... –  Matthew Watson Nov 1 '13 at 14:16
    
@MatthewWatson Why not? What do you think a NullReferenceException really is? –  David Heffernan Nov 1 '13 at 15:59
    
@DavidHeffernan I was thinking I don't see the 0xc0000005 style errors in my stack traces when I get a NullReferenceException, but I didn't notice the context of the topmost message. –  Matthew Watson Nov 1 '13 at 16:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, that's normal. There is no such thing as a "null reference exception" in Windows. These kind of pointer faults are reported by the processor with a general protection fault trap, that generates an access violation exception in the operating system. Exception code 0xc0000005.

Windows setups up the virtual memory for a process by always leaving the bottom 64KB, starting at address 0 unmapped. Specifically to detect pointer bugs, they are very common in programming. A NULL pointer will thus always trip the processor fault. As well as addresses larger than 0, generated when a program tries to access a field of an object through a null pointer.

The CLR intercepts the native access violation exception and looks at the address that caused the exception. If it is located within that 64KB address range then it raises System.NullReferenceException. If it is not then it raises System.AccessViolationException.

The top snippet were the diagnostics generated by Windows, the bottom by the CLR. The top one just shows the native exception code, Windows doesn't know anything about managed exceptions.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.