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I am attempting to pass the return value from scheduling a task into an anonymous class, but I am running into trouble. If I set the return value to a final variable, it says it is not initialized:

/* Not initialized */
final BukkitTask task = Bukkit.getScheduler().runTaskTimer(plugin, new Runnable() {

    public void run() {
        /* irrelevant code */
        task.cancel();
    }

}, 0L, 20L);

I have also attempted passing a variable by calling a method within the anonymous class, however it changes the return type to void and therefore I cannot pass a proper value:

BukkitTask temp = null;
/* Returns void */
temp = Bukkit.getScheduler().runTaskTimer(plugin, new Runnable() {

    private BukkitTask task;

    public void initTask(BukkitTask task) {
        this.task = task;
    }

    public void run() {
        /* irrelevant code */
        task.cancel();
    }

}.initTask(temp), 0L, 20L);

How can I pass a returned value into an anonymous class within the code?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can define this class

class Box<T> {
    public volatile T value;
}

and use it like this:

final Box<BukkitTask> taskBox = new Box<BukkitTask>();
taskBox.value = Bukkit.getScheduler().runTaskTimer(plugin, new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        /* irrelevant code */
        taskBox.value.cancel();
    }
}, 0L, 20L);

However, taskBox.value in run could still be null depending on when runTaskTimer actually executes the runnable.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome solution as well! –  Rogue Nov 1 '13 at 14:28
    
Hm, so then how could I avoid a null value being passed? The volatile would help with reading the newest value, but would the only guarantee be possibly delaying the task slightly (the first passed long)? –  Rogue Nov 1 '13 at 14:34
    
I don't know what runTaskTimer does. If it only runs the runnable after it returns, all is well. If it starts running it before returning, but does so on a different thread, you could make taskBox a future instead of Box and wait for it in run. –  Tobias Brandt Nov 1 '13 at 14:38
    
This seems right, it works with Future and I believe that tasks do return before execution. Thanks! :) –  Rogue Nov 1 '13 at 14:45

see this example

 public static void main(String[] args) {
    final Object objectA[] = new String[1];

    new Thread(new Runnable() {
        private A refA = null;
        public void run() {
            objectA[0] = "Hello World or your object";
        }
    }).start();;

    while (objectA[0] == null){

    }
    System.out.println(objectA[0]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think you missed the question by a slight amount: The idea was passing the return value of the anonymous class into itself (in a sense) –  Rogue Nov 1 '13 at 14:21
    
temp = objectA[0] not works? –  jrey.py Nov 1 '13 at 14:29

My idea, which might sound stupid, would be to create a global variable to which you assign the return value. Then, have a static method that would return this value to you in the anonymous class.

share|improve this answer
    
This also seemed to work! –  Rogue Nov 1 '13 at 14:16
    
My overall stipulation is that if I end up with more than one runnable going at a time, then the second would overwrite the first, which would not be good. –  Rogue Nov 1 '13 at 14:31
    
Then have a Vector of return values. Number each of your runnables so that every anonymous class accesses only the corresponding value of the Vector. Simple ? Vectors are inherently synchronized so no issues of synchronized block or method. OK ? =) –  Little Child Nov 1 '13 at 14:32
    
Rather than using Vector (because of the synchronization on operations), I attempted a Deque but that didn't seem to work either. –  Rogue Nov 1 '13 at 14:37
    
Vector should guarantee thread safety for you. Vector operations are thread safe. –  Little Child Nov 1 '13 at 14:39

I am not sure what are you trying to do. Would Callable instead of Runnable solve the problem? http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/Callable.html

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I attempted to solve it this way earlier, however the issue was passing the correct value to the callable within the runnable, which wasn't possible since I couldn't get the value in the first place. –  Rogue Nov 1 '13 at 14:15

I seem to have figured out an answer rather quickly!

You can change the return type of the init method, and then it will return the proper values for the code!:

BukkitTask task = null;
task = Bukkit.getScheduler().runTaskTimer(plugin, new Runnable() {

    private BukkitTask task;

    public Runnable initTask(BukkitTask task) {
        this.task = task;
        return this;
    }

    public void run() {
        /* irrelevant code */
        task.cancel();
    }
}.initTask(task), 0L, 20L);
share|improve this answer
1  
Doesn't this just set the task in the runnable to null? Pretty sure that initTask is executed before runTaskTimer returns, so the outer task will still be null. –  Tobias Brandt Nov 1 '13 at 14:17
    
Hmm, good thought. I'll test it in a live version. –  Rogue Nov 1 '13 at 14:22
    
@TobiasBrandt you are correct, and it seems the only way to fix that is a switcher statement of public Runnable swap(Runnable temp) that would set a global variable anyhow, so I suppose @LittleChild has a better overall solution. –  Rogue Nov 1 '13 at 14:26
    
see my answer on how to avoid a global variable –  Tobias Brandt Nov 1 '13 at 14:28

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