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Say I have two images and two divs.

<html>
    <body>
        <img id="div0image" class='divImages' alt="" src="../images/div0image.png" />
        <img id="div1image" class='divImages' alt="" src="../images/div1image.png" />

        <div id="div0" class='divs'></div>
        <div id="div1" class='divs'></div>
    </body>
</html>

Assume the CSS is this

#div0, #div1, #div0image, #div1image {
    width: 200px;
    width: 200px;
}

Now, say I have a Javascript function like this

function somethingIsClicked(thisParameter) { //thisParameter needs to be a $(this) object
    var thisID = $(this).attr('id'); //$(this) should refer to the object passed in the parameter (thisParameter)

    $(this).addClass('checkIfThisClassIsAdded');
    alert('works!');
}

And then suppose I have these two functions

$('.divs').click( function() {
    somethingIsClicked($(this));
});

$('.divImages').click( function() {
    thisID = $(this).attr('id'); //div0image
    thisDivsID = thisID.slice(0,4); //div0
    $('#' + thisDivsID).each( function() {
        somethingIsClicked($(this));
    });

Is there a correct way to pass and then receive $(this) as a parameter, And Then refer to the $(this) object in the function which received $(this) as a parameter?

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1  
P.S. #div0, div1, div0image, div1image should be #div0, #div1, #div0image, #div1image. –  Rocket Hazmat Nov 1 '13 at 14:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have two options:

Use a parameter

$('.divImages').click( function() {
    thisID = $(this).attr('id'); //div0image
    thisDivsID = thisID.slice(0,4); //div0
    $('#' + thisDivsID).each( function() {
        somethingIsClicked($(this));
    });

$('.divs').click( function() {
    somethingIsClicked($(this));
});

function somethingIsClicked(element) {
    var thisID = element.attr('id);
    element.addClass('checkIfThisClassIsAdded');
    alert('works!');
}

Or use call to change the context of a function:

$('.divImages').click( function() {
    thisID = $(this).attr('id'); //div0image
    thisDivsID = thisID.slice(0,4); //div0
    $('#' + thisDivsID).each( function() {
        somethingIsClicked.call(this);
    });

$('.divs').click( function() {
    somethingIsClicked.call(this);
});

function somethingIsClicked() {
    var thisID = $(this).attr('id);
    $(this).addClass('checkIfThisClassIsAdded');
    alert('works!');
}
share|improve this answer

Yes, use .call.

somethingIsClicked.call(this)

Optionally, you can pass additional parameters to it, such as the event object:

$('.divs').click( function(event) {
    somethingIsClicked.call(this,event);
});

Or if you have an array of parameters, .apply works the same way.

$('.divs').click( function(event) {
    somethingIsClicked.apply(this,[event,{foo:"Hello World!"}]);
});

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/call

Note however, in this simplified case, it would make more sense to do

$('.divs').click(somethingIsClicked);
share|improve this answer
1  
Okay, so instead of doing "somethingIsClicked($(this));", I should do "somethingIsClicked().call(this);" and then shoud my 'somethingIsClicked' function just be "function somethingIsClicked() { var thisID = $(this).attr('id'); }" with no parameter and that would work? Ah okay, makes sense. Thanks. –  user2719875 Nov 1 '13 at 14:43
2  
That is correct. –  Kevin B Nov 1 '13 at 14:43
2  
You typed it wrong @user2719875. As Kevin showed above, somethingIsClicked.call(this); not somethingIsClicked().call(this) but otherwise yes! –  mcpDESIGNS Nov 1 '13 at 14:55
    
@mcpDESIGNS right, thanks. –  user2719875 Nov 1 '13 at 14:56

You can use .call(thisParamter, arg1, arg2, arg3 ...) or .apply(thisParamter, [arg1, arg2, ... ]).

$('.divs').click( function() {
    somethingIsClicked.call(this);
});

If you don't have other arguments to pass you can use directly:

$('.divs').click(somethingIsClicked)
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You could use $.proxy:

$('#' + thisDivsID).each( function() {
    $.proxy(somethingIsClicked, this)();
});

Your receiving function would then not need any parameters, as this would be within the same scope as the each() block:

function somethingIsClicked() {
    var thisID = $(this).attr('id');    
    $(this).addClass('checkIfThisClassIsAdded');
    alert('works!');
}

Example fiddle

share|improve this answer

Yeh, you can use

call(this, arg1,arg2) or apply(this, arrayOfArgs)

See the link below for a explanation of the differences! http://odetocode.com/blogs/scott/archive/2007/07/05/function-apply-and-function-call-in-javascript.aspx

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