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I'm trying to parse a bit.ly JSON response in javscript.

I get the JSON via XmlHttpRequest.

var req = new XMLHttpRequest;  
req.overrideMimeType("application/json");  
req.open('GET', BITLY_CREATE_API + encodeURIComponent(url)
          + BITLY_API_LOGIN, true);  
var target = this;  
req.onload  = function() {target.parseJSON(req, url)};  
req.send(null);

parseJSON: function(req, url) {  
if (req.status == 200) {  
    var jsonResponse = req.responseJSON;  
    var bitlyUrl = jsonResponse.results[url].shortUrl;  
}

I do this in a firefox addon. When I run I get the error "jsonResponse is undefined" for the line var bitlyUrl = jsonResponse.results[url].shortUrl;. Am I doing anything wrong in parsing JSON here? Or what is wrong with this code?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 72 down vote accepted

The standard XMLHttpRequest has no responseJSON property, just responseText and responseXML. As long as bitly really responds with some JSON to your request, responseText should contain the JSON code as text, so all you've got to do is to parse it:

var jsonResponse = JSON.parse(req.responseText);

If you prefer to use responseJSON, but want a more lightweight solution than JQuery, you might want to check out my JSONHttpRequest. It works exactly like a normal XMLHttpRequest, but also provides the responseJSON property. All you have to change in your code would be the first line:

var req = new JSONHttpRequest();

JSONHttpRequest also provides functionality to easily send JavaScript objects as JSON. More details and the code can be found in my blog: http://pixelsvsbytes.com/2011/12/teach-your-xmlhttprequest-some-json/.

PS: I'm aware that linking to my own blog won't be appreciated here, but I think my script is a good solution to the problem, so I posted it anyway. Please leave a comment if you want me to remove this post and I'll do so.

share|improve this answer
    
pixelsvsbytes.com it's really worth to read –  CapelliC Jul 11 '12 at 22:25
1  
+1; IMO this was the real answer to the question - no jQuery just plain old vanilla XMLHttpRequest; just what the question was about. –  Fergus Morrow Jan 8 '13 at 1:07
    
Theres a jquery version too. If you are getting crossbrowser issues try it, usually framework`s handle these problems better: api.jquery.com/jquery.parsejson –  sagits Jan 29 '14 at 17:01

I think you have to include jQuery to use responseJSON.

Without jQuery, you could try with responseText and try like eval("("+req.responseText+")");

UPDATE:Please read the comment regarding eval, you can test with eval, but don't use it in working extension.

OR

use json_parse : it does not use eval

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3  
For a Firefox addon running with chrome privs, don't try to eval anything you get from an outside source. Instead, use JSON.parse (at least in FF 3.5 and later). –  Ben Combee Dec 29 '09 at 6:25

Note: I've only tested this in Chrome.

it adds a prototype function to the XMLHttpRequest .. XHR2,

in XHR 1 you probably just need to replace this.response with this.responseText

Object.defineProperty(XMLHttpRequest.prototype,'responseJSON',{value:function(){
 return JSON.parse(this.response);
},writable:false,enumerable:false});

to return the json in xhr2

xhr.onload=function(){
 console.log(this.responseJSON());
}

EDIT

If you plan to use XHR with arraybuffer or other response types then you have to check if the response is a string.

in any case you have to add more checks e.g. if it's not able to parse the json.

Object.defineProperty(XMLHttpRequest.prototype,'responseJSON',{value:function(){
 return (typeof this.response==='string'?JSON.parse(this.response):this.response);
},writable:false,enumerable:false});
share|improve this answer

Use nsIJSON if this is for a FF extension:

var req = new XMLHttpRequest;
req.overrideMimeType("application/json");
req.open('GET', BITLY_CREATE_API + encodeURIComponent(url) + BITLY_API_LOGIN, true);
var target = this;
req.onload = function() {target.parseJSON(req, url)};
req.send(null);

parseJSON: function(req, url) {
if (req.status == 200) {
  var jsonResponse = Components.classes["@mozilla.org/dom/json;1"]
      .createInstance(Components.interfaces.nsIJSON.decode(req.responseText);
  var bitlyUrl = jsonResponse.results[url].shortUrl;
}

For a webpage, just use JSON.parse instead of Components.classes["@mozilla.org/dom/json;1"].createInstance(Components.interfaces.nsIJSON.decode

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