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I wrote a simple array in KSH 88 and did the following:

#   Vector  methods
set -A ZeroFilesArr
GlobalIndex=-1

#   Add element at the end
function ZeroFilesArr.push_back {
    let GlobalIndex=$(($GlobalIndex + 1))
    ZeroFilesArr[$GlobalIndex]=$1
    return
}

#   Return size
function ZeroFilesArr.size {
    echo ${#ZeroFilesArr[@]}
}

#   Clear content
function ZeroFilesArr.clear {
    set -A ZeroFilesArr
    let GlobalIndex=$((-1))
}

#   Print contents in format
#   Var1    \t  Var2    \t  ... \t  Var_n
function ZeroFilesArr.print {
    local tempString
    for i in ${ZeroFilesArr[@]}
    do
        tempString="$tempString $i \t "
    done
    echo $tempString
}

I tested afterwards using the following:

ZeroFilesArr.push_back File1
ZeroFilesArr.push_back File2
ZeroFilesArr.push_back File3
echo $(ZeroFilesArr.size)
ZeroFilesArr.print
ZeroFilesArr.clear
echo $(ZeroFilesArr.size)
ZeroFilesArr.push_back File1
ZeroFilesArr.push_back File2
echo $(ZeroFilesArr.size)
ZeroFilesArr.print
ZeroFilesArr.clear

The output is the following

# kernel_coverage.sh

3

File1 File2 File3

0

2

File1 File2

But afterwards I did the following:

#   Kernel Objects
#   KSH Array <<FILES>> Contains strings that represent
#   the objects that are published in the Kernel
set -A FILES $(ls /dev/daKernel/)

function CEILING {
    local DIVIDEND=$1
    local DIVISOR=$2
    let RESULT=$((((${DIVIDEND} + ${DIVISOR}) - 1)/${DIVISOR}))
    echo ${RESULT}
}

#   Checks if the Parameter passed is 
#   a published object of the Kernel and returns
#   the file size
#   Returns a string with the size
function ZERO_FILE_CHECK {
    local kernel_path="/dev/daKernel"
    local FILE_NAME="$kernel_path/$1"
    local retval=$(ls -l ${FILE_NAME} | awk {'print $5'})
    echo $retval
}

#   Checks and returns a statistic of how 
#   many files are in zero in the filesystem
#   I.E. 3 out of 100 would return 3
function ZERO_FIlES_CHECK {
    local let FILES_SIZE=${#FILES[@]}
    local COUNTER=0;
    for f in "${FILES[@]}"
    do
        local let n=$(ZERO_FILE_CHECK $f)
        if [ $n -eq 0 ]; then
            let COUNTER=$(($COUNTER+1)) 
        fi
    done
    local PERCENTAGE=0
    let PERCENTAGE=$(($COUNTER * 100))
    let PERCENTAGE=$(CEILING $PERCENTAGE $FILES_SIZE)
    echo $PERCENTAGE
}

#   Check if the files are not in zero
#   Input: An expected percentage, if bigger than 
#   this then there are too many files in zero size
#   Depends on: ZERO_FIlES_CHECK and the FILES array
#   Returns: 0 (Success) or 1 (Failure)
function CHECK_FILES {
    local let default_percentage=$1
    local let ZEROFILE_PERCENTAGE=$(ZERO_FIlES_CHECK)
    if [[ $ZEROFILE_PERCENTAGE -ge $default_percentage ]]; then
        return 0;
    else
        return 1;
    fi  
}

And it worked too, it returns me whether a folder has too much files in zero or not. So I though it was all set and on the road to happiness riding a wild broncunicorn.

But I was wrong.

I placed my magical push_back inside the ZERO_FIlES_CHECK function like the following:

function ZERO_FIlES_CHECK {
    local let FILES_SIZE=${#FILES[@]}
    local COUNTER=0;
    for f in "${FILES[@]}"
    do
        local let n=$(ZERO_FILE_CHECK $f)
        if [ $n -eq 0 ]; then
            let COUNTER=$(($COUNTER+1)) 
            ZeroFilesArr.push_back $f
        fi
    done
    local PERCENTAGE=0
    let PERCENTAGE=$(($COUNTER * 100))
    let PERCENTAGE=$(CEILING $PERCENTAGE $FILES_SIZE)
    echo $PERCENTAGE
}

And tested it using forcing it to find even the slightest file in zero

if CHECK_FILES 0; then
    ZeroFilesArr.print
    echo $(ZeroFilesArr.size)
fi
ZeroFilesArr.clear
if CHECK_FILES 0; then
    ZeroFilesArr.print
    echo $(ZeroFilesArr.size)
fi

But it always prints the following:

# kernel_coverage.sh

** An empty space here indicating NULL**

0

** An empty space here indicating NULL**

0

After trying several ways I am burned out, it seems I can't come up with a clear solution

Any help would be greatly appreciated

I'm thinking that I have a problem with variable scoping, but I though the global were globals just like anywhere else.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem was bigger than that

There was a design problem since I was reinventing the wheel.

find $kernel_path -size 0 ! -type d | sed -e "s!$kernel_path/!!")

That will give you the list of Zero Size files without the /path/name/.../ and without the folders

So my code got way slimmer since now I only use that find

Everything related to a vector was blown to pieces and the ZERO_FILES_CHECK is now as follows

#   Checks and returns a statistic of how 
#   many files are in zero in the filesystem
#   I.E. 3 out of 100 would return 3
function ZERO_FILES_CHECK {
    set -A FILES $(find $kernel_path -size 0 ! -type d | sed -e "s!$kernel_path/!!")
    set -A ALLFILES $(ls /dev/daKernel/)
    local COUNTER=0;
    local PERCENTAGE=0
    local let FILES_SIZE=${#ALLFILES[@]}
    let PERCENTAGE=$((${#FILES[@]} * 100))
    let PERCENTAGE=$(CEILING $PERCENTAGE $FILES_SIZE)
    echo $PERCENTAGE
}

The CEILING and CHECK_FILES functions remained the same, the rest died.

The bash way is way better

share|improve this answer
    
Unnecessary $(ls /dev/daKernel/) child process, could be just /dev/daKernel/*. BTW, you don't need let any more. –  cdarke Nov 5 '13 at 12:50
    
Thank you @cdarke –  Claudiordgz Nov 6 '13 at 17:51

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