Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a program in which multiples threads update the value of an array.

#include<windows.h>
#include<iostream>
#include<stdio.h>
HANDLE Mutex;
    int n = 100;
static DWORD WINAPI ThreadedUpdate(LPVOID param){
    DWORD GetMutex;
    GetMutex = WaitForSingleObject(Mutex,INFINITE);
    if(GetMutex == WAIT_ABANDONED){
        std::cout << "Error : Could not get Mutex for working Thread. " << std::endl;
        exit(0);
    }
    else if(GetMutex == WAIT_OBJECT_0){
        int* a = (int*) param;
        for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++)
            a[i] += 100;
    }
    if(!ReleaseMutex(Mutex)){
        std::cout << "Error : Could not relese Mutex." << std::endl;
        exit(0);
    }
    return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv){
    int numThreads = 50;
    int* a = new int[n];
    HANDLE* Th = new HANDLE[numThreads];
    Mutex = CreateMutex(NULL,FALSE,NULL);
    DWORD t;
    for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++)
        a[i] = 0;
    for(int i = 0 ; i < numThreads ; i++)
        Th[i] = CreateThread(NULL,0,ThreadedUpdate,(void*)a,0,&t); 
    WaitForMultipleObjects(numThreads, Th, TRUE, INFINITE);
    for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++)
        std::cout << a[i] << std::endl;
    std::getchar();
}

Now, in the above program, i am using a mutex for synchronization. But what I have observe is that even if i do not use synchronization, the answer i am getting is correct. Does it mean locks are not needed in this case. Is += operator is atomic? This is just a sample program. I am using a similar code in a machine learning algorithm where multiple threads are updating a vector. Even in that case, i am getting expected output without using lock. Using a lock is making the program very slow as the updates are very frequent. I just want to make sure that if i do not use lock will there be any problem?

share|improve this question
    
It likely means the time it takes you to cycle in you loop to setup and launch the next thread is longer than the previous thread takes to complete. Its also completely unpredictable, so don't think you can get away with it all the time (or even now). Oh, and you're leaking thread handles, but I doubt you'll care since the process is about to terminate anyway. – WhozCraig Nov 1 '13 at 17:27
    
So what are the options apart from using locks? is there any lock which is fast to acquire and release? also what do you mean by leaking thread handles? – Microbotz Nov 1 '13 at 17:37
    
Second part first, I mean you (correctly) save all those thread handles in an array to wait on them after the creation loop, but they should each still be closed using CloseHandle() once you no longer need them. For the first, you could try a critical section, which should have considerably better performance than the sledge-hammer of a mutex you're using. This is more a code-structure thing than anything else, honestly. – WhozCraig Nov 1 '13 at 17:51
    
HI, I am new to multi-threaded programming. can you be more specific about critical sections? and thanks for the CloseHandle() part. certainly i was missing it. – Microbotz Nov 1 '13 at 17:58
    
Its Windows. CRITICAL_SECTION objects are covered in the same area of the docs as mutex objects. They all fall under the guise of synchronization objects. Check the online help of DevStudio. – WhozCraig Nov 1 '13 at 18:05
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You don't need a mutex or critical section in this code, so long the all writes and reads in the multi-threaded environment are under atomic operations.

Atomics in Windows require long parameters, so start by changing your array to be long rather than int. Then, change the thread procedure to this:

static DWORD WINAPI ThreadedUpdate(LPVOID param)
{
    for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++)
        InterlockedAdd((long*)param + i, 100);
    return 0;
}

Test this with some huge arrays, and I think it will do what you want. Your main() is reduced to:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int numThreads = 50;
    long* a = new long[n];
    HANDLE* Th = new HANDLE[numThreads];

    for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++)
        a[i] = 0;

    for(int i = 0 ; i < numThreads ; i++)
        Th[i] = CreateThread(NULL,0,ThreadedUpdate, a, 0, NULL); 

    WaitForMultipleObjects(numThreads, Th, TRUE, INFINITE);

    for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++)
        std::cout << a[i] << std::endl;
    delete [] a;

    for (int i=0; i<numThreads; CloseHandle(Th[i++]));
    delete [] Th;

    std::getchar();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But my actual arrays are floats. is there any atomic addition present for float. – Microbotz Nov 1 '13 at 18:31
    
@user2812133 Sorry, not really. I'd have to gel on that some more. I don't think you're going to pull that off without at least a CRITICAL_SECTION with the code as structured, but there still might be a way. I'll give a little more thought. – WhozCraig Nov 1 '13 at 21:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.