Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I'm using the Foundation framework on a project & it's Top Bar feature for navigation allows for drop-down navigation to appear on hover.

During the hover event it adds a .hover class to the relevant element, therefore the changes in CSS pop into sight rather than animating by way of a smooth transition.

This got me thinking. Is it possible to animate (via transitions or similar) the changes in CSS definitions?

Take this example. Here is our default element:

<div class="a-box">Some content</div>

And it's default CSS:

.a-box {
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    background: red;
}

On hover the framework (which I do not wish to edit the core file to keep it clean for updates) adds the hover class. Making our element now look like this:

<div class="a-box hover">Some content</div>

Here could be some CSS for the hovered element:

.a-box.hover {
    width: 400px;

    // I thought perhaps adding the following would work but it doesn't appear to

    -webkit-transition: all 200ms ease;
    -moz-transition: all 200ms ease;
    -ms-transition: all 200ms ease;
    transition: all 200ms ease;
}

I'd be keen to hear others POV on this! I'm not sure if this is a duplicate, but all the posts I've read relate to some form of jQuery animation.

share|improve this question
    
Check out Animate.css – Johnny Nov 1 '13 at 17:09
    
This is actually very similar to how AngularJS is trying to implement animations. See docs.angularjs.org/api/ngAnimate -- there may be some additional insight there. – cmw Nov 1 '13 at 17:43

You aren't far off the mark, here is a working example.

The main error in your example is that you have

<div class="my-box hover">Some content</div>

But your CSS is looking for a-box not my-box.

As a habit, I normally define the animation on the simplest (most general) selector for the element and then any additional selectors will benefit from it.

.my-box {
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    background: red;
    -webkit-transition: all 200ms ease;
    -moz-transition: all 200ms ease;
    -ms-transition: all 200ms ease;
    transition: all 200ms ease;
}

.my-box.hover {
    width: 400px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah my mistake, that is a type-o. What I wrote above is an explanation of a concept rather than real code (I've edited the class names). The real issue seemed to be located in the fact I included my transitions within the .a-box.hover declaration opposed to original state. – Sheixt Nov 1 '13 at 17:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.