Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is anyone aware of a test suite or framework for testing new collection classes? Or tests of the standard collections that could be usefully repurposed? It seems like there are many invariants that could be generically tested.

If it matters, I'm working on implementations of IndexedSeq and its kin - not linked-lists, sets, or maps.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

This is not an answer, it would just take too much space in comments. I checked out scala from github (https://github.com/scala/scala) and tried to find any tests. After not being able to find something similar to what you were asking for I tried find:

# find test -iname "*collection*" -type f -exec wc -l {} \;

14 test/files/run/collection-stacks.check
38 test/files/run/collection-stacks.scala
64 test/files/run/collection-conversions.scala
58 test/files/run/unittest_collection.scala
11 test/files/run/collections-toSelf.scala
42 test/files/run/collections.check
125 test/files/run/collection-conversions.check
119 test/files/run/collections.scala
59 test/files/scalacheck/CheckCollections.scala
15 test/files/pos/collections.scala

As you can see all those files are pretty small, so I wonder where the tests are :).

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks - there are also several additional collection-library tests in github.com/scala/scala/tree/master/test/files/scalacheck . As far as I've looked, none are designed for reuse, but they can be mined for invariants. –  Ed Staub Nov 2 '13 at 3:46
add comment

Look into what scala uses

http://www.scala-lang.org/contribute/partest-guide.html

It should be a starting point for you

share|improve this answer
    
This is interesting but only explains how they run tests, not where the tests are and how to use them. –  Aleksey Izmailov Nov 4 '13 at 21:58
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.