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I'm confronted to the following problem : I've implemented a crawler, and I would like to know how many requests have been done during the last second, and what amount of data has been downloaded during the last second.

Currently, I've implemented it using locks. My version uses a queue, and two counters (count and sum). When a task is done, I just increase my counters, and I add an event (with the current date) to the queue When wanting to get the value of my counters, I check if some stuff in the queue is more than 1second old. If so, I dequeue it and decrease my counters properly. Then, I return the wanted result.

This version works well but I would like, for a training purpose, to reimplement it using atomic operations instead of locks. Nevertheless, I' ve to admit that I'm stuck on the "cleaning operation". (dequeuing of old values)

So, is this the good aproach to implement this ?

Which other approach could I use ?

Thanks !

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This version works well but I would like, for a training purpose, to reimplement it using atomic operations instead of locks.

If you need to make multiple changes to the data when the roll period happens, you will need to lock otherwise you will have problems. Any time you have multiple "atomic operations" you need to have a lock to protect against race conditions. For example, in your case, what if something else was added to the queue while you were doing your roll?

Which other approach could I use ?

I'm not 100% sure why you need to queue up the information. If you only are counting the number of requests and the total of the data size downloaded then you should be able to use a single AtomicReference<CountSum>. The CountSum class would store your two values. Then when someone needs to increment it they would do something like:

CountSum newVal = new CountSum();
do {
   CountSum old = countSumRef.get();
   newVal.setCount(old.getCount() + 1);
   newVal.setSum(old.getSum() + requestDataSize);
   // we need to loop here if someone changed the value behind our back
} while (!countSumRef.compareAndSet(old, newVal));

This ensures that your count and your sum are always in sync. If you used two AtomicLong variables, you'd have to make two atomic requests and would need the lock again.

When you want to reset the values, you'd do the same thing.

CountSum newVal = new CountSum(0, 0);
CountSum old;
do {
   old = countSumRef.get();
   // we need to loop here if someone changed the value behind our back
} while (!countSumRef.compareAndSet(old, newVal));
// now you can display the old value and be sure you got everything
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I need this queuing system because I don't want the global number of request, but the number of request done during the last second. An absolute counting is thus not possible in my case. –  Nisalon Nov 1 '13 at 19:49
    
Understood. So every second a thread will do the 2nd block of code which resets the values @Nisalon. Right? –  Gray Nov 1 '13 at 20:02
    
Not exactly. Because I don't want to read every second, I want to read what happened during the last 1000ms. If I use your method, at t=1500ms I'm expecting to have the data of the tasks finished during t=500ms && t=1500ms Using your method, I will have the data of the tasks finished during t=1000ms && t=1500ms –  Nisalon Nov 1 '13 at 20:08
1  
If you want that sort of resolution @Nisalon, then you are going to have to lock like the first part of my answer suggests. –  Gray Nov 1 '13 at 20:25

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