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In my source code I have been extremely careful to use Unicode throughout, always call the wide versions of WinAPI functions, am very careful in my conversions, etc. etc. to support the many users of my program with non-English copies of Windows.

But mistakes creep in, as I am sure you can all understand. I recently ran into a program crash where, in just one place in my code, I called function "isspace" rather than "iswspace".

Is there some tool that allows me to scan my source code for all ANSI function calls, to hopefully find any more mistakes that may be there?

Thank you.

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3  
Make a list of all ANSI function calls and use grep in your source tree? –  anjruu Nov 1 '13 at 17:59
3  
start by defining UNICODE and _UNICODE –  Mgetz Nov 1 '13 at 18:15
6  
It might be easier to look at the symbol table of the final executable (or DLL) instead of the source code. That way you would see each used API function exactly once. You could scan that list manually, then save it as approved and afterwards only scan differences to the approved list on a regular basis. If you like this approach, I can turn this comment into an answer. –  MvG Nov 1 '13 at 20:49
2  
I would do the same "MvG" would do. However I would take a look at the object files: I'd compile the program and use GNU MingW Binutils "objdump -t file.obj" for each object file. This prints a list of all symbols required and defined by an object file. I'd search the output for function names ending with an uppercase "A" (like "MessageBoxA"). If I had a large number of object files I'd write a small programm doing that. –  Martin Rosenau Nov 2 '13 at 6:35
1  
If you use gcc you can always use poison pragma to get compliation error any time you accidentally use a symbol you never intended to use: gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cpp/Pragmas.html –  Darth Hunterix Nov 6 '13 at 14:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I had problems in a software that I was working on a while back. I found out that the problems were caused by the strcpy(), strcat(), etc. all sorts of string functions that had no protections and could overwrite destination buffers if the source had a problem for whatever reason.

What I have done at the time is write a C parser (I was using C back then...) and detected all function calls (that's easy in the C syntax: '(' is a function call if within a block. In C++ you'll have to detect classes and structures as such too, but that's not much more work.) Now you can generate an error on any function that your software is not supposed to use and that breaks your build.

Free C++ parsers exist "all over the place" so you could use one of those and reuse that code.

Now, there is another way too, which uses the preprocessor: for any function that you do not want your software to use, you create a #define which when used generates an error:

#define isspace function-error "please use iswspace() instead of isspace()"

Of course, that means you need to know the list of such functions in the first place, which as someone else mentioned, you could find by looking at your dynamic library link tables. But the result is that you won't be able to compile your software without fixing a few things first. One problem, you must do that in a header file that gets included last or you could get some problems with your library header files:

#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <non_unicode_function.h>
... your functions ...

That is probably simpler than the C++ parser, but it is probably less fun too... Yet, if once in a while you need to call a forbidden function, you could do an #undef which you document clearly, etc. and restore the value afterward.

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I have now compiled a list of ANSI functions from cplusplus.com. Please be very aware of its limitations, in particular:

a) This does not include any WinAPI functions following the form '...A'. b) It does not include any C functions using Microsoft's naming conventions. c) I may have made some mistakes.

However, my hope is that it will prove useful and that the community will help to correct any omissions or errors I may have made.

isalnum
isalpha
isblank 
iscntrl
isdigit
isgraph
islower
isprint
ispunct
isspace
isupper
isxdigit
tolower
toupper
to_string
fprintf
fscanf
printf
scanf
snprintf 
sprintf
sscanf
vfprintf
vfscanf 
vprintf
vscanf 
vsnprintf 
vsprintf
vsscanf 
fgetc
fgets
fputc
fputs
getc
getchar
gets
putc
putchar
puts
ungetc
strtod
strtof 
strtol
strtold 
strtoll 
strtoul
strtoull 
memcpy
memmove
memchr
strchr
strcspn
strpbrk
strrchr
strspn
strstr
strtok
memcmp
strcmp
strcoll
strncmp
strxfrm
strcat
strncat
memset
strlen
strftime
regex
cmatch
smatch
csub_match
ssub_match
isctype
toctrans
ctrans
ctype
ctrans_t
ctype_t
int_t
char
EOF
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