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The list is sorted.

I have a List and I d like to do binary search on it. T has members like StartIndex, EndIndex etc.

I can do binary search on the list with StartIndex, ie: I have implemented IComparable for this.

I need to twist this a little as the following: I want to find a StartIndex that might be OffBy a small value.

For example : T.StartIndex= 100

if the input is 101 and OffBy 1 then BinarySearch Should return this object.

How can I do this?

BTW, i m asking how to this with default binarysearch method that List has. That s what i m interested, not interested in a custom binary search implementation.

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in order to perform a Binary Search, the list needs to be sorted, but you don't mantion that anywhere. –  Mitch Wheat Dec 29 '09 at 7:33
    
I just did..... –  DarthVader Dec 29 '09 at 7:35
    
Yeah Mitch... first 4 words. –  Mark Dec 29 '09 at 7:46
    
@OP: Why not adjust the start and end indices to include those in the first place? –  Mark Dec 29 '09 at 7:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you use List<T>.BinarySearch then it will find the exact position of one exists, or return the bitwise complement of the index at which you would need to insert the item.

So if it returns a negative number, just check the next and previous items (being careful of the ends of course) to see whether either of those is within your desired tolerance.

For example:

int index = list.BinarySearch(item);
if (index < 0)
{
    int candidate = ~index;
    if (candidate > 0 && 
        Math.Abs(list[candidate - 1].StartIndex - item.StartIndex) <= tolerance)
    {
        index = candidate - 1;
    }
    else if (candidate < list.Count - 1 && 
         Math.Abs(list[candidate + 1].StartIndex - item.StartIndex) <= tolerance)
    {
         index = candidate + 1;
    }
    else
    {
         // Do whatever you need to in the failure case
    }
}
// By now, index is correct
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I ll buy that. thanks. –  DarthVader Dec 29 '09 at 7:47

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