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I am trying to pass a char & value to a char * argument in a function, but it's not working as shown below:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void change_sugar(const short& sugars, char* LOC);

int main()
{
    static int caga = 0;
    const short* mysweets;
    char& lala;
    change_sugar(mysweets, lala);
}
void change_sugar(const short& sugars, char** LOC[])
{
    if (sugars == 3000)
        LOC[1] = 5;
    cout << "Sugar is not nCaga, nor caga" << " ___  !@S ";
    cerr << "nCaga failed!";
}

Error output:

error: 'lala' declared as reference but not initialized

I am trying to pass a reference to a pointer of the same type. Is this correct?

Bear with me, I am new to C++, and I think I read the tutorial on pointers and references correctly.

EXTRA: I tried this with a different compiler, Turbo 16, I think, and it threw like ten other errors, so I don't know if it's a compiler problem or not.

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I realize that passing the reference is useless, but I am just trying to practice getting pointers and references right, so I am "playing around" with this stuff until I put it to use. –  user2946290 Nov 1 '13 at 20:07
    
Shouldn't your first question be "why does a reference variable need to be initialized"? –  jxh Nov 1 '13 at 20:09
    
References must be bound (initialized) as the arey created; the binding cannot be changed after the reference is created. Your compiler is complaining correctly. And there's not much chance that a char & could ever be passed legitimately to a function expecting char **[]. That's a nasty function parameter at the best of times — look up Three-Star Programmer to see why. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 1 '13 at 20:09
1  
The definition of change_sugar() conflicts with the earlier declaration. You declared it as taking char *LOC, but the definition says char **LOC[], which is equivalent to char ***LOC. I'm surprised you're not getting errors about that. –  Barmar Nov 1 '13 at 20:11
    
It takes a char *, not a triple pointer! –  user2946290 Nov 1 '13 at 20:13

4 Answers 4

In C++ a reference must always be valid (and not "dangling"), so you have to initalize it when creating it.

I am not sure what you wanted to do with your lala, but a proper usage of a reference variable is like so:

char a;
char & b = a; // has to be initialized here

Now you can use b wherever a variable of type char is meant to be used. However, your function wants char * as its second parameter.

Thus, after initializing the reference, you could still use its address to make it fit: &lala.

Also your definition and declaration is mismatched.

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Huh? I do not understand why would I point to the address of lala to mysweets? The problem is passing lala to the second parameter. –  user2946290 Nov 1 '13 at 20:12

There are lots of things wrong with your code.

A reference and a pointer are not the same thing in the C++ language, although they are implemented the same way in the compiled machine code. You cannot pass a reference where a pointer is expected, and vice versa. You are trying to pass a short* where a short& is expected, and a char& where a char* is expected.

A reference can never be uninitialized (hense the compiler error), but a pointer can be uninitialized.

The parameters in your change_sugar() declaration do not match the parameters in the definition. In C++, they must match.

It is very unclear what change_sugar() is actually trying to do. Clearly, you want to alter the char that is passed in, but char is only 1 byte in size and you are trying to alter memory past the 1-byte boundary of the data being altered.

Try this instead:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void change_sugar(const short& sugars, char* LOC);

int main()
{
    short mysweets = 3000;
    char lala = 0;
    change_sugar(mysweets, &lala);
}

void change_sugar(const short& sugars, char* LOC)
{
    if ((LOC) && (sugars == 3000))
        *LOC = 5;
    cout << "Sugar is not nCaga, nor caga" << " ___  !@S ";
    cerr << "nCaga failed!";
}

Or this:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void change_sugar(const short& sugars, char& LOC);

int main()
{
    short mysweets = 3000;
    char lala = 0;
    change_sugar(mysweets, lala);
}

void change_sugar(const short& sugars, char& LOC)
{
    if (sugars == 3000)
        LOC = 5;
    cout << "Sugar is not nCaga, nor caga" << " ___  !@S ";
    cerr << "nCaga failed!";
}
share|improve this answer

There's a very simple paradigm for passing variables to methods wanting pointers:

void clear(char *p) { *p = '\0'; }

char c = 'a';
clear(&c);     // after this call c == '\0'

Are you actually looking for something more advanced here?

Reference variables:

char &r = c;

Are actually pretty complicated. (And would still be passed with &r)

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There are a lot of things that bothers me with the code so I'll go through some them.

1: Your prototype does not match.

Change

void change_sugar(const short& sugars, char** LOC[])

to

void change_sugar(const short& sugars, char* LOC)

or the other way around depending on what you actually want to do.

2. Your pointer is not initialized.

const short* mysweets is not initialized. Allocate some memory for it.

const short* mysweets = malloc(sizeof(short));

then

*mysweets = 3000;

3. lala is not a pointer.

If you want to pass the address of lala to your function, change_sugar, initialize it as so

char* lala = malloc(sizeof(char));

and pass it as

change_sugar(mysweets, lala);

If you don't want it to be a pointer but still want to pass by reference, declare it as so

char lala;

and pass it as

change_sugar(mysweets, &lala);

Finally:

Your code is very confusing to read and to figure out what you actually want to do. I suggest to step back and think about what you want to achieve and redesign your code.

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Thanks! Helped heaps.... –  user2946290 Nov 1 '13 at 21:26

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