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It's well-documented that Python's shelve module requires all keys to be strings and that there are various workarounds (see threads here and here). My question is, why does shelve require string keys? Given that I can pickle a dict that uses other objects as keys, and that shelve uses pickle under the hood, why can't shelve handle such keys itself? Do string keys make it vastly simpler to update only a piece of the persistent object rather than having to rewrite the whole thing (and if so, why)?

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my guess would be that its using keys as the column name of its persistence db and databases are picky about column names – cmd Nov 1 '13 at 20:27
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because under the hood the shelve module uses one of bsddb, gdbm or dbm for storage, and they support only string keys.

You're right that you can pickle a dict that uses other objects as keys, but then when one key changes, you have to flush the whole storage. By using a key-value database like those, only the changed values are flushed.

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So is the answer that shelve uses database formats that are not Python-specific, and so are not as Python-friendly as pure pickle? So there is no technical reason why one couldn't write a shelve-like library that allowed more types as keys if one were willing to forgo compatibility with non-Python databases? – kuzzooroo Nov 1 '13 at 21:08
    
Well, there would be no point in having concern over compatibility with non-Python databases when you're storing a Python-specific format in them. You're always free to wrap the shelve in an interface that accepts anything as keys and serializes that into a string that can be stored and retrieved. – Pedro Werneck Nov 1 '13 at 21:19
    
Thank you for the pair of quick responses. You write, "You're always free to wrap the shelve in an interface that accepts anything as keys and serializes that into a string that can be stored and retrieved." What I don't understand is why Python doesn't effectively do this by default. Is it just that the library's creators were building on existing, non-Python tools to save the work of building something from scratch (i.e., no technical limitation)? Or is there some other reason to base shelve on bsddb, gdbm, and dbm? – kuzzooroo Nov 1 '13 at 21:29
    
Frankly, I believe that's more of a hack and not a very robust implementation, but if you want to be sure, you'll have to do some research to figure that out. Check the Python mailing lists around 1999, bug trackers, etc. – Pedro Werneck Nov 1 '13 at 22:11
    
For posterity: I would summarize the results of my dialog with Pedro as: "As far as we can tell, there's no deep technical reason why keys must be strings, but the makers of shelve chose (probably for expediency) to build on existing platforms that had this restriction." – kuzzooroo Nov 3 '13 at 14:53

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