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I am trying to create an overloaded function num2str(x) which will take integer or real values as input and return a string value. My purpose of doing this is to use it when writing log file.

Based on suggestions given in my previous post (creating log file) I have created a subroutine message(msglevel, string) which I am using to write my log file. Now I can only send a string to this function and I am trying to make it easy to create a string using num2str(x).

Could someone explain me where should I place this code (In a subroutine, in a module) so I can access it from everywhere. I saw an example of this, but it uses it in the main program, which I can't do.

Please let me know if this approach is correct.I would also like to know if I can modify num2str(x) to return string for array variables.

!GLOBAL FUNCTIONS
interface num2str
    function num2str_int(number)
        integer,intent(in)::number
        character(len=*)::num2str_int
    end function
    character function num2str_real(number)
        real::number
        character(len=*)::num2str_real
    end function
end interface 
function num2str_int(number)
    implicit none
    integer,intent(in)::number
    character(len=*)::num2str_int
    write(num2str_int,'(I)')number
    return
end function
character function num2str_real(number)
    implicit none
    real,intent(in)::number
    character(len=*)::num2str_real
    write(num2str_real,'(F6.4)')number
    return
end function
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Did you try defining it in a module and using it from there, and if yes, what is the problem? –  IRO-bot Nov 1 '13 at 20:43
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would definitely go for a module:

module strings

  ! GLOBAL FUNCTIONS
  public :: num2str

  ! Everything else is private
  private

  interface num2str
    module procedure num2str_int
    module procedure num2str_real
  end interface 

contains

  function num2str_int(number)
      implicit none
      integer,intent(in) :: number
      character(len=6)   :: num2str_int
      character(len=6)   :: tmp

      write(tmp,'(I6)')number
      num2str_int = tmp
  end function

  function num2str_real(number)
      implicit none
      real,intent(in)    :: number
      character(len=6)   :: num2str_real
      character(len=6)   :: tmp

      write(tmp,'(F6.4)')number
      num2str_real = tmp
  end function
end module

program test_strings
  use strings

  write(*,*) num2str(1)//' '//num2str(1.23)  
end program
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the explanation. I tried to run the above code, but getting error message: Error 1 error #5082: Syntax error, found '::' when expecting one of: <IDENTIFIER> in the location module procedure :: num2str_int. Don't know what's wrong. –  Amitava Nov 1 '13 at 21:18
    
Ah, I came across that one once... Just remove the double colons: module procedure num2str_int, and module procedure num2str_real. According to the Fortran 2008 Standard (Ch. 12.4.3.2) they are optional, but ifort seems to have problems with them... –  Alexander Vogt Nov 1 '13 at 21:20
    
I removed the colons from the code... –  Alexander Vogt Nov 1 '13 at 21:26
    
Yippee! It worked! Thanks a lot. –  Amitava Nov 1 '13 at 21:29
1  
That is due to overflowing the format specifier: F6.4 is due short to hold your number. You need to extend the specifier (and the string lengths). –  Alexander Vogt Nov 2 '13 at 8:40
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Thank you all for your help. Here's the code I wrote which should work similar to num2str() in MATLAB. It has additional functionality to show arrays and matrices as well.

module module_common_functions
 !GLOBAL FUNCTIONS
  public :: num2str

  interface num2str
      module procedure num2str_int
      module procedure num2str_real
      module procedure num2str_array
      module procedure num2str_matrix
  end interface

contains

function num2str_int(number)
    implicit none
    integer,intent(in)::number
    character(len=10)::num2str_int
    character(len=10):: tmp
    write(tmp,'(I6)')number
    num2str_int=trim(adjustl(tmp))
    return
end function

function num2str_real(number)
    implicit none
    real,intent(in)::number
    character(len=32):: tmp
    ! Deferred length allocatable character result.
    character(len=:), allocatable ::num2str_real
    ! Format specifier changed to use full length.
    write(tmp,'(F32.4)')number
    ! Reallocation on assignment means length of result will 
    ! be set to match length of right hand side expression.
    ! Note ordering of trim and adjustl.
    num2str_real=trim(adjustl(tmp))
end function

function num2str_array(number,col)
    implicit none
    integer::i,col
    real, dimension(col)::number
    character(len=32):: tmp
    character(len=33*col)::num2str_array
    num2str_array =''
    do i=1,col
        write(tmp,'(F12.4)') number(i)
        num2str_array = trim(num2str_array)//adjustl(trim(tmp))//','
    end do
    return
end function 

function num2str_matrix(number,row,col)
    implicit none
    integer::i,j,row,col
    real,dimension(row,col)::number
     character(len=32):: tmp
    character(len=33*row*col)::num2str_matrix
    num2str_matrix=''

    do i=1,row
        do j=1,col
            write(tmp,'(F12.4)') number(i,j)
            num2str_matrix= trim(num2str_matrix)//adjustl(trim(tmp))//','
        end do
    end do
    return
end function


end module
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Need a bit more help. Currently the posted program num2str(x) returns a string which is not trimmed. Hence, I need to use trim(num2str(x)). Is there any way to fix this? –  Amitava Nov 4 '13 at 22:03
    
Two options: a) Determine and specify the exact length of the result in the specification part of the function itself, such that there are no trailing blanks or b) use deferred length allocatable character (added to the language in the Fortran 2003 standard) and do the trim inside the function. –  IanH Nov 4 '13 at 22:30
    
Could you please give an example of the option (b) you mentioned. I don't think option (a) is feasible for my case. –  Amitava Nov 5 '13 at 5:17
    
See edits to your answer. –  IanH Nov 5 '13 at 5:27
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