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I have a large pandas dataframe (~13 million rows) that contains data on various items, each with observations from various months. The items vary with respect to the number of corresponding rows (i.e. months with observed data), and months may or may not be consecutive. A highly abbreivated simplified sample:

                          x         y
item_id date
4       2006-01-01  5.69368  0.789752
        2006-02-01  5.67199  0.786743
        2006-03-01  5.66469  0.783626
        2006-04-01  5.69427  0.782596
        2006-05-01  5.70198  0.781670
5       2006-05-01  3.16992  1.000000
        2006-07-01  3.25000  0.978347

What I need to accomplish for the data is the following: For each item, forward fill observations from the first observed row for that item to a specified maximum date. Thus, given the example above, the desired output is the following:

                          x         y
item_id
4       2006-01-01  5.69368  0.789752
        2006-02-01  5.67199  0.786743
        2006-03-01  5.66469  0.783626
        2006-04-01  5.69427  0.782596
        2006-05-01  5.70198  0.781670
        2006-06-01  5.70198  0.781670
        2006-07-01  5.70198  0.781670
        2006-08-01  5.70198  0.781670
        2006-09-01  5.70198  0.781670
        2006-10-01  5.70198  0.781670
        2006-11-01  5.70198  0.781670
        2006-12-01  5.70198  0.781670
5       2006-05-01  3.16992  1.000000
        2006-06-01  3.16992  1.000000
        2006-07-01  3.25000  0.978347
        2006-08-01  3.25000  0.978347
        2006-09-01  3.25000  0.978347
        2006-10-01  3.25000  0.978347
        2006-11-01  3.25000  0.978347
        2006-12-01  3.25000  0.978347

To facilitate further analyses, I then need the date index converted to a simple numeric index (which we'll call "seq"), such that the final result is:

                  x         y
item_id seq
4       0   5.69368  0.789752
        1   5.67199  0.786743
        2   5.66469  0.783626
        3   5.69427  0.782596
        4   5.70198  0.781670
        5   5.70198  0.781670
        6   5.70198  0.781670
        7   5.70198  0.781670
        8   5.70198  0.781670
        9   5.70198  0.781670
        10  5.70198  0.781670
        11  5.70198  0.781670
5       0   3.16992  1.000000
        1   3.16992  1.000000
        2   3.25000  0.978347
        3   3.25000  0.978347
        4   3.25000  0.978347
        5   3.25000  0.978347
        6   3.25000  0.978347
        7   3.25000  0.978347

(The point of this is to allow me to average the first, second,...,nth observations across items). In any case, I have a solution to this that works fine if I operate on only a subset of the data:

df = pd.read_table(filename,sep='\s*',header=None,names=['item_id','date','x','y'],index_col=['item_id','date'],parse_dates='date')
maxDate = '2006-12-01'
def switchToSeqIndex(df):
    minDate = df.index[0][1] # get the first observed date
    return df.reset_index(level='item_id',drop=True).reset_index(). \
            set_index('date').reindex(pd.date_range(minDate,maxDate,freq='MS'), \ 
            method='ffill').reset_index('date',drop=True)
df_fixed = df.groupby(level='item_id').apply(switchToSeqIndex)
df_fixed.index.names[1]='seq'

In principle this is great, and generates the correct output, but when I attempt to perform the operation on the full dataset (13 million rows, expanded a substantial amount by the reindexing), the memory usage is out of control (crashing a machine with 20gb ram).

My question, then, is how I can accomplish this while reducing my memory overhead. I think the problem is trying to perform the reindexing with the groupby/apply method, but I don't kow what the alternative is. It seems like there should be way I could do something similar iteratively that would require less memory, but I'm not sure how to go about it.

share|improve this question
    
Don't do it all in memory. Write your table using HFDStore. Read it back in chunks, process, and write to a new file, see several very similar problems here –  Jeff Nov 1 '13 at 20:41

1 Answer 1

I would solve this by creating a DataFrame that just contained the full set of dates needed. Then group the original DataFrame by ID and join on the date-DataFrame using outer, to pull in any missing dates (and consequently, x and y will be NaN for the rows where the dates had to be pulled in with the join).

After that, group by ID, sort by date in whatever order you need it, and then just use a regular call to fillna to forward fill all the NaN values in the x and y columns.

I've done this kind of task with DataFrames with > 200 million rows before (on a system with 12 GB of RAM) and yeah, it's not instantaneous, but it's not slow enough to matter either.

Some pseudocode:

df = your_current_df.reset_index().set_index("item_id")
# Or, use something smarter with unstack(level=1) and possibly some 
# in-place option.

# I assume this puts the dates into a regular column called 'date'

# Do stuff to make all the dates you could possibly need
dates_df = pandas.DataFrame(...)

df = pandas.merge(df, dates_df, left_on="date", right_on="date", how="outer")
df.sort("date", ascending=True, inplace=True)
df.groupby("item_id").fillna(method="ffill")
share|improve this answer
    
I like this in principle, but it doesn't seem to work. Here's am ipython notebook I whipped up quickly that illustrates my attempt to use your method, and compares it my original method: dropbox.com/s/hdfl4qcqhst4wzs/Scratch2.html –  moustachio Nov 2 '13 at 16:36

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