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My code works with this kind of structures

K>> mlf=sparse([],[],[],2^31+1,1); mlf(1)=1; mlf

mlf =

                  (1,1)                       1

but it fails with this kind of inputs below where I choose the terms in mlf that are larger than zero (I cannot understand how this selection makes the input different)

K>> mlf=sparse([],[],[],2^31+1,1); mlf(1)=1; mlf(mlf>0)

ans =

   (1,1)        1

where the only visual difference is some tabs/spaces.

Please, explain how they are different.

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1  
The first command prints the whole matrix, while the second command prints a slice of it (note that mlf(mlf>0) is a new, anonymous variable). My guess is that the disp of the sparse takes into account that the maximum index into it may be (2147483649,1), to which the disp adjusts its spacing. The anonymous variable has more information available (such as it being only 1 element long), so its disp will have less spacing. Just as a general interest: how and why does your code depend on the displayed version of a sparse? –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 1 '13 at 21:13
    
Ah nevermind, I misunderstood your question (just refreshed). As I said, mlf is a 2147483649x1 sparse with 1 filled value, whereas mlf(mlf>0) is a new, anonymous variable of size 1x1 (still sparse though). Type whos ans after the last command to check this. –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 1 '13 at 21:19
    
@RodyOldenhuis The command does not show any difference: stackoverflow.com/a/19735613/164148 –  hhh Nov 1 '13 at 21:23
2  
no, because you're doing something different than before; you're assigning mlf(mlf>0) to mlf, and not to ans...Change all whos ans in your version to whos mlf and you'll see –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 1 '13 at 21:27
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the answer is the size of the resulting array, as Rody suggested:

>> mlf=sparse([],[],[],2^31+1,1); mlf(1)=1; size(mlf(mlf>0))
ans =
     1     1
>> mlf=sparse([],[],[],2^31+1,1); mlf(1)=1; size(mlf)
ans =
                2147483649                         1

*EDIT 1: Indexing works properly:

>> mlf(mlf>0) = 2
mlf =
                  (1,1)                       2

This is functionally equivalent to using find:

>> mlf(find(mlf)) = 2
mlf =
                  (1,1)                       2

It seems like a good conclusion that display is formatting the output with enough space for an element at (2147483649,1), but only when you are indexing for an assignment to that element (think lvalue vs rvalue).

*EDIT 2: If you are going after those elements in a full (not sparse) variable, use full:

>> full(mlf(mlf>0))
ans =
     1

*EDIT 3: To assign to the last element according to the dimensions of mlf rather than to the last non-zero element,

>> mlf(numel(mlf))=77
mlf =
                  (1,1)                       1
         (2147483649,1)                      77

*EDIT 4: To remove negative values:

mlf(mlf<0)=0; % or mlf(find(mlf<0)) = 0;

If you want to make a copy and remove the negatives:

mlf2 = mlf;
mlf2(mlf2<0) = 0;
mlf3 = mlf;
mlf3(mlf3>0) = 0;

Then you have mlf with all values, mlf2 with only positives, and mlf3 with only negatives. The key thing with this is that the size stays the same as with the original mlf so you are able to use the things such as end in the original way based on the size of the sparse, hurray!

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@hhh I'm confused about the problem then. It is working as expected. What should be different? By the way, you can use nonzeros(mlf) if you just want the non-zeros. –  chappjc Nov 2 '13 at 0:11
    
Can you show what is failing with an error? Thanks. –  chappjc Nov 2 '13 at 0:14
    
[Update] Now I spot my mistake! It is related to mlf=sparse([],[],[],2^31+1,1); mlf(1)=1; mlf=mlf(mlf>0); mlf(end)=77 where I try to reference so that mlf(2^31+1)=77 but what it does is actually mlf(1)=77 -- how should I deal with this? I want that the size of mlf is all the time the same. If the size changes, the end result into pecularities... –  hhh Nov 2 '13 at 0:57
1  
@hhh - Interesting. Apparently end translates to the index of the last non-zero element, rather than according to the array's dimensions. If you are going after the last position in terms of size you could do mlf(numel(mlf))=77 although that seems ugly to me. –  chappjc Nov 2 '13 at 1:03
1  
let us continue this discussion in chat –  chappjc Nov 2 '13 at 1:13
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Rody Oldenhuis recommended the whos

>> mlf=sparse([],[],[],2^31+1,1); mlf(1)=1; mlf=mlf(mlf>0)

mlf =

   (1,1)        1


>> whos mlf
  Name      Size            Bytes  Class     Attributes

  mlf       1x1                32  double    sparse    

>> mlf=sparse([],[],[],2^31+1,1); mlf(1)=1; mlf

mlf =

                  (1,1)                       1

>> whos mlf
  Name               Size            Bytes  Class     Attributes

  mlf       2147483649x1                32  double    sparse    

which shows the key problem: the size of the structures have changed. chappjc provided a way to solve this problem by introducing new variables.

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1  
When you do mlf=sparse([],[],[],2^31+1,1); mlf(1)=1; mlf=mlf(mlf>0); whos ans, the variable ans is not from any of these commands because they are all assignments rather than bare expressions. In this case, who knows what was last assigned to ans. –  chappjc Nov 1 '13 at 22:18
    
@chappjc thank you, fixed! +1 –  hhh Nov 1 '13 at 23:53
    
Feel free to +1 my answer instead. ;) The use of size is sufficient to show the problem without reassigning mlf as in your new first command, but whos demonstrates the reason too. –  chappjc Nov 2 '13 at 0:00
    
@chappjc It demonstrates the reason but it does not provide a way to fix it: I am trying to use mlf>0 as an index for the mlf. The mlf is a sparse structure, I cannot see why mlf(mlf>0) is not working, thinking... What am I doing wrong? –  hhh Nov 2 '13 at 0:02
    
Oh, I didn't understand you were looking for a solution. I think you are indexing mlf correctly. It returns that element of the sparse matrix. The confusion is that when you do a bare mlf(mlf>0) without an assignment, this is like an rvalue, not an lvalue. If you do mlf(mlf>0) = 2, then it will work as desired, with display spacing as expected. Updated answer demonstrates this. –  chappjc Nov 2 '13 at 0:05
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