Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to write a SQL query which accepts a bind variable (say :NUM) and its output consists of one column & :NUM number of rows, each row having its row number. i.e. if we pass :NUM as 7, the output should be:

VAL
====
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

There shouldn't be any actual DB tables in query and no PL/SQL code should be used. i.e. only dual should be used in the query

Is there any way to achieve this?

share|improve this question
    
retagged as oracle, hope that was correct –  Rob Fonseca-Ensor Dec 29 '09 at 9:20
    
@Rob: Postgres also supports PLSQL, but doesn't support FROM DUAL so Oracle is correct. –  OMG Ponies Dec 29 '09 at 9:39
    
Thanks Rob, its correct this question was meant only on Oracle DB –  Harish Dec 29 '09 at 11:50

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You could use:

 WHERE ROWNUM <= :NUM

...but the table has to contain row equal or greater to the limit in the bind variable. This link demonstrates various row number generation techniques in Oracle.

Using CONNECT BY, Oracle 10g+:

SELECT LEVEL
  FROM DUAL
CONNECT BY LEVEL <= :NUM

Confirmed by monojohnny that the bind variable can be used. Attempts to run on Oracle 9i, though CONNECT BY syntax is supported results in an ORA-01436 error.

The only thing I'm not 100% on is if the CONNECT BY will accept the limit from the bind variable.

Reference:

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This method is also suggested here: adp-gmbh.ch/ora/sql/examples/generate_rows.html –  Mark Byers Dec 29 '09 at 9:36
    
This gives me an error for any value above one. SELECT LEVEL FROM DUAL CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 20 : ORA-01436 –  Kobi Dec 29 '09 at 9:44
    
@Kobi: What version - it works for me on 10g –  OMG Ponies Dec 29 '09 at 9:46
    
Good point, it worked on a a newer server (10g), but not on 9.0.1.5.0. Other options from your link work well, though. –  Kobi Dec 29 '09 at 9:51
    
With regard to this working with a bind variable: I tried it and it does work (used 10.2.0.1.0): I'll post an answer to this effect for reference. –  monojohnny Dec 29 '09 at 9:59

I didn't come up with this answer [ so make sure any votes go the right way!!] , it just my testing notes based on 'OMG Ponies' [who wasn't sure whether the method would work with binding variable] above for reference:

Connected to:
Oracle Database 10g Enterprise Edition Release 10.2.0.1.0 - Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP and Data Mining options

SQL> var num_rows number
SQL> begin select 20 into :num_rows from dual;
  2  end;
  3  /

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> select level from dual
  2  connect by level <=:num_rows;

     LEVEL
----------
         1
         2
         3
         4
 ...
share|improve this answer

Try something like:

SELECT 1 AS Val FROM dual
UNION ALL SELECT 2 FROM dual
UNION ALL SELECT 3 FROM dual
UNION ALL SELECT 4 FROM dual
UNION ALL SELECT 5 FROM dual
UNION ALL SELECT 6 FROM dual
UNION ALL SELECT 7 FROM dual;

It's messy, but it'll do the trick.

Edited: Ah - you need to pass in a variable to let you know how high to go...

So how about something like:

SELECT t1.Val + t2.Val * 2 + t3.Val * 4 + t4.Val * 8 AS Val
FROM
(
SELECT 0 AS Val FROM dual
UNION ALL SELECT 1 FROM dual
) AS t1, 
(
SELECT 0 AS Val FROM dual
UNION ALL SELECT 1 FROM dual
) AS t2, 
(
SELECT 0 AS Val FROM dual
UNION ALL SELECT 1 FROM dual
) AS t3, 
(
SELECT 0 AS Val FROM dual
UNION ALL SELECT 1 FROM dual
) AS t4
WHERE t1.Val + t2.Val * 2 + t3.Val * 4 + t4.Val * 8 <= 7;

Ok... editing again, now using WITH:

WiTH 
A0 AS (SELECT 0 as N FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 0 FROM DUAL),
A1 AS (SELECT 0 as N FROM A0, A0 AS B),
A2 AS (SELECT 0 as N FROM A1, A1 AS B),
A3 AS (SELECT 0 as N FROM A2, A2 AS B),
A4 AS (SELECT 0 as N FROM A3, A3 AS B),
A5 AS (SELECT 0 as N FROM A4, A4 AS B),
A6 AS (SELECT 0 as N FROM A5, A5 AS B),
Nums AS (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY N) AS Val FROM A6)
SELECT *
FROM Nums
WHERE Val <= :NUM
;
share|improve this answer
    
What if I pass 100 as :NUM? –  Giorgi Dec 29 '09 at 9:21
    
...then you continue the pattern as required. You could use a recursive CTE, but I'm not sure what the Oracle syntax is for that. You could also use a row_number style approach. –  Rob Farley Dec 29 '09 at 9:26
    
@Rob: Oracle support for recursive WITH clauses starts 11g iirc. –  OMG Ponies Dec 29 '09 at 9:32
    
Yeah, but I'm not sure if it's the same as in MS-SQL. –  Rob Farley Dec 29 '09 at 10:44
    
@OMG - Done now, using a CTE. Not recursive though... –  Rob Farley Dec 29 '09 at 10:52

Depends on database various method can be used.

PostgreSQL has a nice feature -- series.

To get what you want just want:

SELECT * FROM generate_series(1, NUM);
share|improve this answer
2  
I think from the mention of 'PL/SQL' and the 'dual' table that he wants a solution for Oracle. –  Mark Byers Dec 29 '09 at 9:33

I'm marking this community wiki since it doesn't actually answer your requirement for no tables, but one of the first things we do when installing a database is to create a set of tables for this sort of purpose.

  • A table containing a large number of integers (e.g., -99999 through 99999).
  • A table containing every date from 10 years in the past to 10 years in the future (which is continuously added to each month and trimmed occasionally).
  • A table containing each hour of the day.

By doing this, we greatly reduce the complexity, and increase the speed, of a large number of our queries at the cost of (minimal and cheap) disk space.

You should give some serious thought to that. Aside from maintaining the date table, there's not a lot of upkeep needed.

share|improve this answer
    
DUAL is the best way to perform this kind of thing - in 10g+ Oracle gives FAST DUAL which involves zero block reads. DUAL will almost always outperform home-made tables. –  Jeffrey Kemp Dec 29 '09 at 10:47
    
No doubt, but we don't use just Oracle. The solution we have is vendor-agnostic and performs more than fast enough. –  paxdiablo Dec 29 '09 at 10:51

Another solution would require some PL/SQL to create a function to return a collection with the rows... Not as simple as the select level from dual connect by level <= :b1 approach, but it's useful in a few situations:

1) Create a number table object type ( number_tbl, in this example ) :

create or replace type number_tbl as table of number;

2) Create a function that will receive the number of rows to be generated, and then return a number_tbl object with the results:

create or replace function get_rows( i_num_rows number ) return number_tbl as
  t number_tbl := number_tbl();
begin
  if i_num_rows < 1 then
    return null;
  end if;

  t.extend( i_num_rows );

  for i in 1..i_num_rows loop
    t(i) := i;
  end loop;

  return t;
end get_rows;

3) select from your function using the table( ... ) function to turn your number_tbl object into something selectable:

select * from table( cast ( get_rows( :b1 ) as number_tbl ) );
share|improve this answer

connect by is such a wonderful thing. It helps you generated multiple rows with a single set of data available in dual table. This can help you generate huge no of rows for your dummy data. For example

insert into test select a.* from test1 a,(select * from dual connect by level <=100000) b;

or you can do something like this

Example 2 : You want to print square and cube of numbers from 1 to 10.

SQL> select level "No", power(level,2) "Square", power(level,3) "Cube"  from dual     connect by level <= 10;

    No     Square       Cube
---------- ---------- ----------
     1          1          1
     2          4          8
     3          9         27
     4         16         64
     5         25        125
     6         36        216
     7         49        343
     8         64        512
     9         81        729
    10        100       1000

Hence you can manipulate it in whatever form you want. This is how you can return multiple rows from dual table. References : http://www.oraclebin.com/2012/12/multipe-rows-from-dual-table.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.