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The below code prints:

5

Why does it print 5? Also if it returns 5 why it doesn't print "James"? I do not understand the below code. If I delete the else word it prints -1. However shouldn't it return a default value?

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int fonk()
{
    int a = 5, b = 3;
    int c = a*b;
    if(c >10)
    {
        if( a<b && a >0)
        {   cout <<"James";
        return a;
        }

        else if(b<0)
        {
            return b;
        }

    }
    else return -1;

}

int main()
{
    int x = fonk();
    cout << x;
}
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That code should never be returning 5. I would check to make sure you do not have any compiler errors that are preventing the application from being recompiled to make sure you are actually starting the right executable. –  Nabren Nov 1 '13 at 23:34
    
What compiler? For me, it most definitely does not print or return 5... –  Reed Copsey Nov 1 '13 at 23:34
3  
this code cannot be compiled, as not all path returns values –  Lashane Nov 1 '13 at 23:34
1  
@IlyaBursov, I've found a quote about UB: "[n3337:6.6.3.2]: Flowing off the end of a function is equivalent to a return with no value; this results in undefined behavior in a value-returning function." but this is well-formed program, so, compiler should pass this code. –  soon Nov 1 '13 at 23:53
1  
@IlyaBursov: it's because occasionally someone will want to write code like if (condition) return 1 else throw_exception();. The compiler doesn't know that throw_exception() doesn't return (although some compilers let you declare that it doesn't). It would be a nuisance to have to write return 0; at the end of that function just to shut up an error about how allegedly there's a path that doesn't return. Basically, C++ prioritizes correct code being sensible, over incorrect code giving useful errors... –  Steve Jessop Nov 2 '13 at 0:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You are hitting undefined behaviour. Your function actually doesn't return anything! Look at each condition:

  • c>10? yes.
  • a<b && a >0? no.
  • b<0? no.

So you never hit any of the returns. This means absolutely anything could happen in your program. In your case, it seems to just so happen that 5 is stored where the program expects a return value.

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So the first two lines of fonk delcare the following values:

int a = 5, b = 3, c = a *b;

So a is 5, b is 3 and c is 15.

if(c >10)

15 is greater than 10.

    if( a<b && a >0)

this is not true, so the James/return a branch is not executed.

    else if(b<0)

b is 3, which is >= 0, so the return b statement is not executed.

else

this statement refers to "c > 10", the c > 10 was true, so this else clause is not executed.

}

your function ends without returning anything, this invokes "Undefined Behavior".

Solutions: Remove the 'else' from else return -1; or add a return -2; to see the case where your code followed none of the paths.

I see you're using GCC -- add the '-Wall' option to get maximal diagnostics from the compiler, it should tell you that your function has a code path which does not return a value.

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Nah, you've got it slightly wrong. Your last else belongs to the first if statement, so that will never be called. Your function happens to return 5 because that happens to be in the place where the compiler normally places the return value.

You can't rely on that though as it is undefined behavior as per the C++ standard section 6.6.3 (if my google skills serve me right).

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this is offtopic for this site, but lets go through each line

int a=5, b =3;
int c = a*b;

c is 15 right now

if(c >10) // 15>10 - true
{
    if( (a<b) && (a>0) ) // 5<3 - false, so we go further
    {
        cout <<"James";
        return a;
    }
    else if(b<0) // 3<0 - false, we go further
    {
        return b;
    }
    // here is error, should be another one return
}
else
    return -1; // this will not be executed, as it is else for if (c>10)

update: why it returns 5 - usually return value of function is placed into (e)ax register (I assume you're on x86 platform), so your compiler used ax for storing value of a during comparison

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How is it off topic? –  GManNickG Nov 2 '13 at 0:09
    
@GManNickG question "must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved", if OP didn't even try to debug code - this is not minimal understanding, I can say that no any kind of analytic/debug work was done here at all –  Lashane Nov 2 '13 at 0:26

If you exit a function that returns int without return ing a value, the result is undefined. Not a default value.

The compiler could print 5, could print 0, coukd print 4232732, or it could format your hard drive. All woukd be legal C++ results of your program.

The way to handle this is two fold: turn on warnings and warnings as errors, as there is most definitely a wsrning for not all control paths returning a value.

Second, do not make functions where not all control paths return a value.

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