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Right now I'm using something like this: Basically the program is supposed to print X (right most digit of a #) to X decimal places for example:

  • entered 3.56, should display 0000000000000003.560
  • entered 56.7 should display: 000000000056.700000
  • entering 1002.5 should display 00000000000001002.50

but number % 10,condition right now only accepts number w/o decimals, so the program closes if i enter a number with decimals I only need an alternative for number % 10.

double number;
if (number % 10 == 1)
System.out.printf("%020.1f\n",number);
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bit masking <!----> –  Jigar Joshi Nov 1 '13 at 23:37
1  
I don't understand what it is supposed to do. Printing a digit to that number of decimal places makes no sense, and doesn't match your examples. I don't think you are using the words correctly. –  Robin Green Nov 1 '13 at 23:38
3  
Your title says "the right most digit of an integer", but number is a double. What exactly do you need? –  ajb Nov 1 '13 at 23:40
3  
I "see the description". I still have no clue what it means. –  ajb Nov 1 '13 at 23:44
1  
ok so you see 56.7 (6 is the right most digit integer in the number) so 000000000056.700000 <- has 6 decimal places. With a field width of 20. in (3.56) 3 is the right most integer digit, so 0000000000000003.560 <- has 3 decimal places –  Brian Do Nov 1 '13 at 23:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems that you are looking for something like

System.out.printf("%020." + ((int) number) % 10 + "f\n", number);

((int) number) will get rid of fraction making 56.7 -> 56, so now you can safely use %10 to get last digit.

DEMO

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hmm let me try that –  Brian Do Nov 2 '13 at 0:04
    
IT WORKS THANKS@ –  Brian Do Nov 2 '13 at 0:23
    
You are welcome :) –  Pshemo Nov 2 '13 at 0:26

If I have interpreted your question correctly then this looks like it does what you ask:

public void test() {
  strangePrint(3.1415);
  strangePrint(2.0);
  strangePrint(2.1);
  strangePrint(2.2);
  strangePrint(2.999);
  strangePrint(37.4);
  strangePrint(3.56);
  strangePrint(56.7);
  strangePrint(1002.5);
}

private void strangePrint(double d) {
  // Get the integer part
  int n = (int)d;
  // The last digit of the integer defines the decimal places.
  int digits = n%10;
  System.out.printf("%020."+digits+"f\n", d);
}

prints

0000000000000003.142
00000000000000002.00
00000000000000002.10
00000000000000002.20
00000000000000003.00
000000000037.4000000
0000000000000003.560
0000000000056.700000
00000000000001002.50
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@BrianDo I thought you said you couldn't use the mod operator. If that's still the case, my solution works. –  Steve P. Nov 2 '13 at 0:03
    
I can use it, but i thought there was another way let me try it –  Brian Do Nov 2 '13 at 0:09

From number in format:

ABCDEX.FGHI

you can extract X by:

int x = (int) original; //get rid of what is after the decimal point
//now x is ABCDEX
x = x % 10;
//now x is X

now you can join this int with string to create pattern for printf.

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Based off of your original post, it seemed like you weren't allowed to use mod, so here's how I would do it:

private void transform(Double number)
{
    int result;
    int x = number.intValue();

    if (x < 10)
    {
        result = x;
    }
    else
    {
        Double y = x / 10.0;
        int z = y.intValue();
        result = x-10*z;
    }

    System.out.printf("%020." + result + "f\n", number);
}

Test runs:

transform(3.56);
transform(56.7);
transform(1002.5);  

Prints:

0000000000000003.560
0000000000056.700000
00000000000001002.50

EDIT:
If I misinterpreted and you are allowed to use mod, then the answer is simply:

private void transform(Double number)
{ 
     System.out.printf("%020." + ((int) number) % 10 + "f\n", number);
}

as others have suggested. Sorry if I misunderstood.

share|improve this answer
    
alright let me see if it works –  Brian Do Nov 2 '13 at 0:16
    
IT WORKS THANK YOU@! –  Brian Do Nov 2 '13 at 0:20

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