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I'm trying to write an algorithm that takes a variable amount of generic arrays, stored in d_arrays, and gathers all the unique elements (elements which occur exactly once) among them and stores them in an array, called d_results. For example, the arrays:

int intA[] = { 12, 54, 42 };
int intB[] = { 54, 3, 42, 7 };
int intC[] = { 3, 42, 54, 57, 3 };

Would produce the array d_results with the contents { 12, 7, 57 }.

Here's my current algorithm for the process:

template <class T>
inline
void UniqueTableau<T>::run() {
    T* uniqueElements = d_arrays[0];
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 1; i < d_currentNumberOfArrays; ++i) {
        if (count == 0) {
            uniqueElements = getUnique(uniqueElements, d_arrays[i], d_sizes[i - 1], d_sizes[i]);
            ++count;
        }
        else {
            uniqueElements = getUnique(uniqueElements, d_arrays[i], d_numberOfElementsInResult, d_sizes[i]);
        }
    }
    d_results = uniqueElements;
}

template <class T>
inline
T* UniqueTableau<T>::getUnique(T* first, T* second, int sizeOfFirst, int sizeOfSecond) {
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;
    int k = 0;
    T* uniqueElements = new T[sizeOfFirst + sizeOfSecond];
    while (i < sizeOfFirst) {    // checks the first against the second
        while ((first[i] != second[j]) && (j < sizeOfSecond)) {
            ++j;
        }
        if (j == sizeOfSecond) {
            uniqueElements[k] = first[i];
            ++i;
            ++k;
            j = 0;
        } else {
            ++i;
            j = 0;
        }
    }
    i = 0;
    j = 0;
    while (i < sizeOfSecond) {    // checks the second against the first
        while ((second[i] != first[j]) && (j < sizeOfFirst)) {
            ++j;
        }
        if (j == sizeOfFirst) {
            uniqueElements[k] = second[i];
            ++i;
            ++k;
            j = 0;
        } else {
            ++i;
            j = 0;
        }
    }

    T* a = new T[k];    // properly sized result array
    for (int x = 0; x < k; ++x) {
        a[x] = uniqueElements[x];
    }

    d_numberOfElementsInResult = k;
    return a;
}

Note that d_sizes is an array holding the sizes of each array in d_arrays, and d_numberOfElementsInResult is the number of elements in d_results.

Now, what this array is doing is comparing two at a time, getting the unique elements between those two, and comparing those elements with the next array and so on. The problem is, when I do this, sometimes there are elements that are, for example, unique between the third array and the unique elements of the first two, but not unique between the third and first. That is confusingly worded, so here's a visual example using the arrays from above:

First, the algorithm finds the unique elements of the first and second arrays.

{ 12, 3, 7 }

Now, it checks this against the third array, producing the unique elements between those.

{ 12, 7, 42, 54, 57 }

Right? Wrong. The problem here, is that since 42 and 54 don't appear in the unique array, they end up in the final product, even though they are common to all three arrays.

Can anyone think of a solution for this? Alterations to this algorithm are preferred, but if that's not possible, what's another way to approach this problem?

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1  
Why don't you put all elements in all arrays in a singke array, sort it and then do a linear tracersal to check for repititions. –  user1990169 Nov 2 '13 at 2:25
    
This isn't the cleverest and probably isn't the most performant solution but I would just dump all of the arrays into a dictionary of counts, keyed by the integer (e.g. 54 is in all three arrays so (54, 3) would be in your dictionary after processing all of the arrays). At the end, just iterate over the buckets and only grab the ones with a count of one. –  roliu Nov 2 '13 at 2:31
    
@roliu that's exactly what I suggest in my answer. –  user1990169 Nov 2 '13 at 2:33
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EDIT: As pointed out the algorithm is O(nlogn) time and O(n) space complexity.

Do a traversal of each element in all the arrays and form a map of the count of each item traversed.

Once the map is created, just iterate through it and form array of those elements for which count is one.

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2  
Not quite O(n) time for std::map - inserting into an std::map is O(log n). Using an std::unordered_map with amortized constant time insertions would give you O(n). –  mattnewport Nov 2 '13 at 3:04
    
Sorry, I am unfamiliar with std::map. If I were to do this, would the Key be the count of the element? Or would I make the Key the element and its value the count? Thanks. –  Will Nov 2 '13 at 17:15
    
@Will Yes key shall be element and value shall be count. –  user1990169 Nov 2 '13 at 17:23
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Memory is the problem and though I'd do this in a different way (due lack of experience?) -- Actually I was thinking of the answer that just got posted!

Anyways, do not throw away your duplicates and save them in a secondary array. Take this array and append it twice to each new array and this will allow little change to your algorithm. Only change is creating the duplicates and looking through a larger list each time. Though this adds time and memory. If that is a concern then go with the first posted answer!

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solution 1:

  1. Just put all the element of all the arrays in to one.
  2. sort the array
  3. remove duplicate.

solution 2:

  1. create a map where key is the element and value is boolean
  2. just traverse individual array. if the element is not present in the map than put key as the element and value as true. But if the element is already present than make the value as false.
  3. Now just print the element from the map whose value part is true i.e. just occurred once.

Why i am putting value as boolean not an integer:

As we know that if an element in the form of key in the map is present, it shows the element is present in the array. So if we make false next time if we find the element again it shows duplicate. Hope you understand.

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