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For describing my problem I will use the certain analogy which is simpler for analysis and in my opinion well is reflecting my problem.

Let's assume that there is a Library class which contains two lists: of books and of bookshelves. In PHP both lists it is easiest to implement as arrays and I did so - I created two public fields in the class Library: books and bookshelves, and in constructor I initialized them with arrays.

class Library
{
    public $books;
    public $bookshelves;

    public function __construct () {
        $this->books = array();
        $this->bookshelves = array();
    }
}

Everything would be well, becouse methods which are implemented in arrays are sufficient. But from a point of view of the programming best practice, this code seems incorrect for me. I think this class isn't so hermetic, is it? It is necessary to remember for what that field is used for and how to treat him. For example, if I wanted to add the book to the library, I would search method addBook in Library class. I'd never have thought that I must perform method add on the field books of Library class.

Therefore I should do fields books and bookshelves as private, and in the Library class implement functions addBook/addBookshelf, removeBook/removeBookshelf, getBook/getBookshelf etc.

class Library
{
    private $books;
    private $bookshelves;

    public function __construct () {
        $this->books = array();
        $this->bookshelves = array();
    }

    public function addBook (Book $book) {
        $this->books[] = $book;
    }

    public function removeBook ($id) {
        $this->books[$id] = [];
    }

    public function getBook ($id) {
        return $this->books[$id];
    }

    public function addBookhelf (Book $book) {
        $this->bookshelf[] = $book;
    }

    public function removeBookhelf ($id) {
        $this->bookshelf[$id] = [];
    }

    public function getBookhelf ($id) {
        return $this->bookshelf[$id];
    }
}

But it's also incorrect. Why would anyone spend time writing second time the same which is already implemented in arrays? And what with the principle one class, one responsibility?

The third way is creating two class: BooksList and BookshelvesList which extended ArrayObject class. They don't have any additional methods or fields.

class BooksList extends ArrayObject
{
}

class BookshelvesList extends ArrayObject
{
}

Next, I should initialize public fields books and bookshelves with this classes.

class Library
{
    private $books;
    private $bookshelves;

    public function __construct ()
    {
        $this->books = new BooksList();
        $this->bookshelves = new BookshelvesList();
    }
}

Then Library class isn't responsible for operations on the books and on the bookshelves. And array operations aren't being written second time. But are creating two strange objects which aren't adding something new.

So I invented three possibilities of implementing of my problem, but every has some defects. It isn't some complicated relation and it will be easy and elegant way to implement this. I looked for some design pattern which fit to this problem, but I didn't find. Therefore I'm asking here, how to implement this correctly?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Dagon, Vladislav Rastrusny, w0lf, George, Stephane Delcroix Nov 2 '13 at 13:17

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
what is correct? what is best practice? –  Dagon Nov 2 '13 at 8:31
    
@Dagon Are you really asking what "best practice" is ? Dude, how did you get 9000 reputation on this site ??? –  Sliq Nov 2 '13 at 12:40
1  
@Panique He's trying to insinuate that these terms are subjective and thus off topic –  phoebus Nov 2 '13 at 20:04
    
exactly, theses are not absolutes. –  Dagon Nov 2 '13 at 20:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just taking one of your questions:

Why would anyone spend time writing second time the same which is already implemented in arrays?

If you were just prototyping or something you probably wouldn't. But most other times it's better to be able to control access to the key data in your object. It gives you protection from the code being misused later (someone adding a Tree object directly to your $books array for example - you can add validation in your addBook function to prevent that easily). Secondly it gives you a bit more flexibility. What if the client suddenly decided they wanted an email sent to the librarian every time a book was added to the book collection? If you've allowed your code to add directly a public variable from anywhere you've probably got quite a maintenance job ahead of you!

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I agree with you. And so do you think that a second or third solution is best? –  veeveeoor Nov 2 '13 at 9:03
1  
Personally I'd probably go with option 2 in this instance. But I think that's just a personal preference thing rather than there being a really good reason to choose one over the other. –  danielpsc Nov 2 '13 at 9:10

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