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I am new to SQL and i was executing the below query. I am trying to retrieve complete data from table emp and count the no of records in each group but am ending up with errors.

Please guide me whether the logic am using here is correct or wrong neither the below query for me

SELECT * 
, COUNT(*) 
FROM EMP 
GROUP BY EMPNO,ENAME,JOB,MGR,HIRE DATE,SAL,COMM,DEPT NO;

select * 
, count(*) 
from emp 
group by deptno

( i used deptno here because its the first column in this table)

share|improve this question
1  
In strict implementations like Oracle 8i, an aggregate function (like MIN or MAX) must be used for each column not specified in the GROUP BY clause. * won't work therefore you'll have to spell out each column some wrapped with e.g. MAX(). – user645280 Nov 2 '13 at 13:18
    
"count the no of records in each group" - which group do you want to count? – a_horse_with_no_name Nov 2 '13 at 13:28

When you use GROUP BY, then in SELECT you can use only rows from GROUP BY and aggregate functions (e.g. sum, count etc).
For example here

select 
   emp.* , count(*) -- it's illegal 
from 
   emp 
group by 
   deptno

you can use only deptno and aggregate functions in SELECT clause

select 
    deptno, count(*) -- it is legal 
from 
    emp 
group by 
    deptno
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the clarification llya – keshav Nov 2 '13 at 13:39
SELECT 
  t.*,
  COUNT(*) over (partition by EMPNO,ENAME,JOB,MGR,HIRE_DATE,SAL,COMM,DEPT_NO) as cnt
FROM EMP t
share|improve this answer

To retrieve all columns and still get a count based on a specific group you can use a window function (Oracle calls them "analytical functions"):

You didn't tell us which "group" you actually want, but this should give you an idea:

SELECT emp.*,
       count(*) over (partition by dept_no) as employees_per_department, 
       count(*) over (partition by mgr) as employees_per_manager, 
       count(*) over () as total_nr_of_employees
FROM EMP 
share|improve this answer

It is meaningless to select all columns, and group by some of them, as it would be indeterminate as to what to show for the non-grouped column - for these you should either omit them (if you don't need them), or use an aggregation function, such as MIN() or MAX() etc so you could do:

SELECT      EMPNO,
            ENAME,
            JOB,
            MGR,
            "HIRE DATE",
            SAL,
            COMM,
            "DEPT NO",
            COUNT(*) 

FROM        EMP 

GROUP BY    EMPNO,
            ENAME,
            JOB,
            MGR,
            "HIRE DATE",
            SAL,
            COMM,
            "DEPT NO"
share|improve this answer
    
The [ and ] are illegal in SQL (standard SQL as well as Oracle). To use quoted identifiers you have to use double quotes "DEPT NO" – a_horse_with_no_name Nov 2 '13 at 13:27
    
@a_horse_with_no_name wasn't tagged with [oracle] at the time, but have edited :/ – Rowland Shaw Nov 2 '13 at 13:40
    
But it was tagged with SQL which means the answer should be standard SQL compliant. SQL is not a specific DBMS product. It's a (standardized) query language – a_horse_with_no_name Nov 2 '13 at 13:47
    
@a_horse_with_no_name Indeed, it's a shame that quoting column names differs across the major RDBMSs – Rowland Shaw Nov 2 '13 at 13:50
    
All DBMS support the ANSI standard when it comes to quoted identifiers. The only ones that don't comply with the standard in a default installation are SQL Server and MySQL. – a_horse_with_no_name Nov 2 '13 at 14:07

When using aggregates and group by, your group by clause has to include all the non-aggregate columns and only the non-aggregate columns from your select clause. So it has to be like this:

select field1, field2, etc, count(*) records
from etc
group by field1, field2

You shouldn't use select *, but if you do, this syntax might work, or it might not. You would have to try.

select t.*, count(*) records
from yourtable t etc
group by t.*

Apparently MySQL allows you to mismatch the fields in the select and group by clauses, but that seems to open the door for very strange results. However, I don't work with MySQL so I wouldn't actually know.

Some databases allow you to use aliases in your group by clause. Something like this:

select field1 f1, count(*) records
from etc
group by f1

From a logic perspective, it depends on what you are attempting.

share|improve this answer
    
As dan suggested i tried the below query with some manuplation SELECT EMP.* ,COUNT(*) FROM EMP GROUP BY JOB,MGR,HIREDATE,SAL,COMM,EMPNO,ENAME,DEPTNO; but this query gave me result of all the records, which is as good as using select * from emp; should the above query be grouped by job ? please help me to understand this – keshav Nov 2 '13 at 13:38

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