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I wanted to know if boost has any libraries that assist in implementing spin locks. I know boost supports mutexes but I could not find any examples that show or describe spinlocks in boost.Any examples showing how to implement a spin lock using boost(preferably) would be appreciated.(C++98)

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2 Answers 2

Example using Boost.Atomic:

#include <boost/atomic.hpp>

class SpinLock
{
    boost::atomic_flag flag; // it differs from std::atomic_flag a bit -
                             // does not require ATOMIC_FLAG_INIT
public:
    void lock()
    {
        while( flag.test_and_set(boost::memory_order_acquire) )
            ;
    }
    bool try_lock()
    {
        return !flag.test_and_set(boost::memory_order_acquire);
    }
    void unlock()
    {
        flag.clear(boost::memory_order_release);
    }
};

LIVE Demo on Coliru

#include <boost/range/algorithm.hpp>
#include <boost/atomic.hpp>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

class SpinLock
{
    boost::atomic_flag flag;
public:
    void lock()
    {
        while( flag.test_and_set(boost::memory_order_acquire) )
            ;
    }
    bool try_lock()
    {
        return !flag.test_and_set(boost::memory_order_acquire);
    }
    void unlock()
    {
        flag.clear(boost::memory_order_release);
    }
};

int main()
{
    using namespace std; using namespace boost;

    SpinLock lock;
    vector<thread> v;
    for(auto i = 0; i!=4; ++i)
        v.emplace_back([&lock, i]
        {
            for(auto j = 0; j!=16; ++j)
            {
                this_thread::yield();
                lock_guard<SpinLock> x(lock);
                cout << "Hello from " << i << flush << "\tj = " << j << endl;
            }
        });
    for(auto &t: v)
        t.join();
}

Output is:

Hello from 0    j = 0
Hello from 1    j = 0
Hello from 3    j = 0
Hello from 2    j = 0
Hello from 3    j = 1
Hello from 1    j = 1
Hello from 3    j = 2
Hello from 2    j = 1
Hello from 1    j = 2
Hello from 2    j = 2
Hello from 1    j = 3
Hello from 2    j = 3
Hello from 1    j = 4
Hello from 3    j = 3
Hello from 2    j = 4
Hello from 1    j = 5
Hello from 2    j = 5
Hello from 1    j = 6
Hello from 2    j = 6
Hello from 1    j = 7
Hello from 2    j = 7
Hello from 1    j = 8
Hello from 2    j = 8
Hello from 3    j = 4
Hello from 2    j = 9
Hello from 3    j = 5
Hello from 1    j = 9
Hello from 2    j = 10
Hello from 1    j = 10
Hello from 2    j = 11
Hello from 3    j = 6
Hello from 1    j = 11
Hello from 2    j = 12
Hello from 3    j = 7
Hello from 1    j = 12
Hello from 2    j = 13
Hello from 3    j = 8
Hello from 2    j = 14
Hello from 3    j = 9
Hello from 1    j = 13
Hello from 2    j = 15
Hello from 1    j = 14
Hello from 3    j = 10
Hello from 1    j = 15
Hello from 3    j = 11
Hello from 3    j = 12
Hello from 3    j = 13
Hello from 3    j = 14
Hello from 3    j = 15
Hello from 0    j = 1
Hello from 0    j = 2
Hello from 0    j = 3
Hello from 0    j = 4
Hello from 0    j = 5
Hello from 0    j = 6
Hello from 0    j = 7
Hello from 0    j = 8
Hello from 0    j = 9
Hello from 0    j = 10
Hello from 0    j = 11
Hello from 0    j = 12
Hello from 0    j = 13
Hello from 0    j = 14
Hello from 0    j = 15
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Here is a sample using C++11 atomic:

#include <atomic>

typedef std::atomic<bool> Lock;

void enterCritical(Lock& lock) {
    bool unlocked = false;
    while (!lock.compare_exchange_weak(unlocked, true));
}

void exitCritical(Lock& lock) {
    lock.store(false);
}
share|improve this answer
    
1. It is better to use std::atomic_flag for that purpose, because it is guaranteed to be lock-free. 2. There is Boost.Atomic library which also has boost::atomic_flag. –  Evgeny Panasyuk Nov 2 '13 at 15:15
    
However, the atomic_flag interface is different: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/atomic/atomic_flag -> you can't use compare and exchange, only test and set. –  erenon Nov 2 '13 at 15:17
    
re2: Why use Boost if there's an STL equivalent? (Assuming C++11) –  erenon Nov 2 '13 at 15:18
    
I am looking for a c++98 implementation –  Rajeshwar Nov 2 '13 at 15:19
    
@erenon Yes, atomic_flag has different interface, but it is enough to implement spin-lock. Regarding standard library (not STL!) - yes, of course it is better to use it if available, but question was about Boost, so I presume it is not. –  Evgeny Panasyuk Nov 2 '13 at 15:22

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