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Code Complete book suggested, it is a good practice to use meaningful names for loop control variables.

For example:

  for(int month=0; month < MONTHS_PER_YEAR; month++){

    // processing

  }

Instead of single letters for example

 for(int i=0; i < MONTHS_PER_YEAR; i++){

  // processing

 }

I follow this practice and use meaningful names for each loop control variables. Recently one of my code reviews was failed due to above practice. My code reviewer said “You should use short concise variable name such as I, j for loop control variable”

What do you think?

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3  
this should be wiki, as it's subjective and argumentative –  Rubens Farias Dec 29 '09 at 12:44
3  
@Rubens I agree its subjective, but it is not argumentative, we're being asked what we think in a very open way. –  Simon Dec 29 '09 at 12:47

15 Answers 15

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I think that it depends on the context. In a loop where the variable will be used to index an array you should use short letters such as i,j,k, but in your case month is better as it is clearer.

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The code given is not enough to know if it is clearer. What needs to be clear is code inside the body of the loop. If all the loops in the rest of the codebase use i,j, and k, can you say that the second sample is unclear? –  Mocky Dec 29 '09 at 13:33
1  
@Mocky: I agree.. there's no way to know if month is clearer than i –  user195488 Dec 29 '09 at 13:52
  1. Developers should not be finding out what the coding standards are for a project during a code review. There should be documentation of the project's coding standards, preferably before coding starts. Often there are multiple approaches to a situation like this (index naming conventions). With established standards, everybody will do it the same way.
  2. Personally, I use a mixed approach. For short blocks, I use i, j, k which everyone will recognize as indexers. For longer blocks with multiple indexes, I give the indexes more meaningful names. It's easy to get lost when reading through nested loops and you can't remember what k is.
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This, exactly. Both 1 and 2. –  CPerkins Dec 29 '09 at 16:30

Yes. It has the following benefits:

  • It makes your code much more readable and self-documenting, which makes it easier to maintain, especially if you work in a team.
  • It makes it possible to search for much more specific things in your code. Searching for "i" is a nightmare - even if you turn on "match case" and "match entire word" you still get loads of irrelevant hits because you've used "i" as a general purpose name in a hundred unrelated loops.
  • It makes it much easier to re-use a loop elsewhere (no variable name clash) if you have a trivial loop that can be copy-and-pasted (Not that I advocate c&p programming, but it does at least make this a lot safer)
  • It makes it possible to add nested loops in the future without having to refactor it all. So it often saves you future effort.
  • It can make code much less error prone. I use prefixes based on the usage of variables (i.e. nothing like hungarian notation, which adds useless junk to the name), which means I can mix variables with different usages in the same code, while they all have meaningful names:

    Vehicle mVehicleList[32];
    Driver  mDriverList[16];

    void MyFunction()
    {
        for (int iVehicle = 0; iVehicle < 32; iVehicle++)
        {
            Vehicle *pVehicle = &mVehicleList[iVehicle];

            for (int iDriver = 0; iDriver < 16; iDriver++)
            {
                if (mDriverList[iDriver].VehicleId == pVehicle->VehicleId)
                    ...
            }
        }
    }

Note how I can mix Vehicle, mVehicleList, pVehicle and iVehicle, and how the array name always matches the index you use with it: mVehicleList[iVehicle]. So I can't easily use the wrong index with the array: it's obvious that mVehicleList[iDriver] is wrong.

Compare this to:

for (int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < 16; j++)
    {
       if (d[i].VehicleId == v[j].VehicleId)
           ...
    }
}

Now I can't easily tell what this code is doing. It's just generic/abstract/vague, so I have to actually work out the logic to determine what it is up to. There are far fewer hints to aid quick understanding. So it'll take me much longer to update this method that some other programmer wrote - they have just reduced our project velocity by being lazy.

And - aw, crud - I've mixed up the meaningless names i and j and have just run off the end of my 'drivers' array!

  • Lastly, you can take the body of MyFunction and email it to someone else, and they can read it and understand exactly what it is doing, because the naming and prefixes provide a lot of useful "metadata" to the reader - you don't need the declarations of the parameters or member variables it uses to know what is going on. Without the prefixes and good naming, you have no idea what the loops are trying to achieve, so then the sender has to augment this snippet with a long explanation of what the snippet does.

To look at the other side of the coin, the arguments against it are:

  • More typing. Auto-completion/intellisense in modern IDEs mean that this is just not true.
  • More reading/more verbose. True. But we're not trying to write the shortest piece of code, we're trying to write well designed, maintainable code.

Of course, there are occasionally utterly trivial loops where there is no need to go to this trouble, and a simple "i" is fine. e.g. This is perfectly readable as it is:

for (int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
    mVehicleList[i] = NULL;

(But I'd still use iVehicle myself)

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What do you call an index variable for pods? –  MiseryIndex Dec 30 '09 at 3:13

To me, it's personal preference to use i,j,k for loop iterators. The comparison value usually something explicit like MONTHS_IN_YEAR or DAYS_IN_MONTH. Code Complete is a good book, but you don't have to follow it completely. I don't think you should of gotten bad marks for not using i,j, or k. Maybe in the future, a better suggestion would be to use monthIndex instead of month. I haven't seen the array, but maybe because it comes out as

month[month]

It does not look right and thus

month[monthIndex]

or month[i], would look better.

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I agree with you that month is more useful and descriptive. I can also see the argument that i, j and k are idiomatic, but C idioms aren't always well thought out. That its the thing you're iterating over in the for loop isn't really as important as what's in it. If the loop is small (as it should be), the declaration is right there for all to see.

I certainly wouldn't fail a change for using either style, at least not in C. Its too thin a hair to split. I don't think anyone would really be confused.

In a language that uses iterators it becomes obvious which style is correct.

# Perl
for my $month (@months) {
    ...
}
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I'd say it depends on what's inside the block. If it's a short block and very obvious usage e.g. looping on an array of chars 'i' suffices.

If you have more code inside the block and that can lead to ambiguities, use a more meaningful name.

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The variable names are only for developer\maintainer of the code. The compiler anyways don't use them for any optimization based on the name, so short and concise variable name has no advantages compared to meaningful names.

Most of the time when you are looping through array\vector\list using index then (i, j, k) look simple to use. You should use the appropriate variable name based on the context. In your case month suits.

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3  
Never had the experience like "damn, was i the row or the column in this matrix?"... It is argued (in the same Code Complete) that sometimes the bigger cost of a software product is the time spent by developers trying to figure out the meaning of i, j and k in swiftly written loop constructs. The compiler doesn't really care, so doesn't count. –  xtofl Dec 29 '09 at 13:37

Like Darin says, it depends on the context. In general though, the more specific you name your variables, the better the readability of your code. Thus, in your example, I would go with the first option. I only use variable names like i if I'm just looping through the index of an array (e.g. its length) and that itself doesn't have any other meaning.

I would explain to your reviewer that though it may depend on the context, saying that you should always user short concise variable names is not a good practice in itself. Show him an example where using good variable names makes the context much clearer.

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Using i,j, and k as loop variable names is an idiom. It is an idiom so common that it leads to instant recognizability of the variable and its significance. The meaning is added to them by virtue of the fact that they always represent loop variables. If you know what you are looking at the moment you see the name, that is meaningful. The meaningful names concept goes hand in hand with the principle of least surprise.

Using a meaningful name for a loop variable may aid you personally in your own code, but when others need to read your code it may not help them. Simple things done in simple and expected ways can be more helpful.

If loop complexity makes i,j, and k undesirable a refactoring is probably in order rather than breaking the idiom.

It's easier to understand the code and catch bugs when a code base uses common idioms consistently. Idioms are important when you work on a team. Idioms aid consistency and reduce the friction when reading each others code.

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1  
+1 for mentioning the idiom: fortran developers are used to it. Haskell programmers use a:as, Ruby guys use array.each {|e|...} –  xtofl Dec 29 '09 at 13:40
    
I find the assertion 'that it leads to instant readability' highly questionable. It depends. It may well be the case that what the index variable is indexing over is useful information. In that case, I would argue, a descriptive name will be more useful both to you and to other readers of the code. I was tempted to mark your answer down because its such a blanket statement (but resisted). I'd add that these practices should be looked at as guidelines, not rules. The difference being the need to think about what you're doing - guidelines being only generally appropriate. –  Phil Dec 29 '09 at 15:00
    
@Phil I think recognizability is more accurate than readability. Editing the answer to reflect that. As an example, if the loop body contains an assignment to "month" it might not seem out of place at first sight but if there is an assignment to i it's immediately obvious as a potential source of trouble. –  Mocky Dec 29 '09 at 15:16

I guess it depend very much on your personal/company code guidelines. I still use variables like i,z,x but at my girlfriends company you would get into trouble for doing so. But meaningful names can never be wrong.

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Variables with large scope should have long names, variables with small scope can have short names. Scratch variables used for temporary storage or indices are best kept short. A programmer reading such variables should be able to assume that its value is not used outside a few lines of code. So, it all depends on the context and scope of your variables.

Again for better readability, your variable names should be self explanatory unless you are defining loop variables which may have smaller scope.

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I can't recall the time I used i,j,k as an variable name. I always use meaning fullnames. For instance when I just need an indexer to loop throug an array I use index instead of just plain i. By giving it that name I immediately recognize what the variable will be used for. Another example, when you are in need of two indexer (the so called i, j), this is only in the case when you gave nested loops. Again I will try to give it a meaningfull name, mostly row and column. Whenever I would be in need of three loops with indexer, I'm considering redesigning my code.

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I would say the loop idiom is so well known, that I would vote on using short variable names to avoid clutter; the exception perhaps being where there is a complicated enough nesting to warrant more meaningful names, somewhere in the logic inside the loops....

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It is not a compulsion to use meaningful names for loop construct variables. But, it is surely a good practice. The reason is that sometimes, you will code a particular application and after some time (here, by "some time" I mean days, weeks, months or even years) you might want to check the code for any reason. At such times, you'll not have to wonder what each loop construct variable was purported or intended to do.

Also, during code reviews, the people reviewing the code come to know what a particular code snippet does.

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I agree with BadKarmaZen, I can not remember the last time I used 'i' as an itterator. I used to think I wrote pretty understandable code and liked the ideom of a single character that specified: indexer. Then I read 'code complete'...

The whole book "Code Complete" (just like 'Design patterns' from the G.o.F.) is about managing complexity. I took a good look at the code I had written thusfar and came to the conclusion that what seems completly obvious at the moment of writing, after 6 months any loop with 'just an indexer' needs to be reverse enginered. (Boy, did my code suck.)

The most important thing that stuck after reading the book has now become my personal mantra: "Things always get more complex/ change is the only constant."

With that in mind, a loop with just an 'i' indexer will grow to the point that the variable name is no longer appropriate and needs to be changed. If you know that in advance you might as well give it a good name to start with. For that very same reason I will always use block delimiters for 'if' statements and throw exceptions in the 'default' clause of an switch statement. If you do not, somewhere in the future it will come back to haunt you.

Of course, using an "for each" loop is even better but not always possible.

Small note: three nested loops with variable names i,j,k is just begging for trouble. Create 100 of those in an application and you'll have a job for life.

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