Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I skip the tuples which has duplicate elements in the iteration when I use itertools.product? Or let's say, is there anyway not to look at them in the iteration? Because skipping may be time consuming if the number of lists are too much.

Example,
lis1 = [1,2]
lis2 = [2,4]
lis3 = [5,6]

[i for i in product(lis1,lis2,lis3)] should be [(1,2,5), (1,2,6), (1,4,5), (1,4,6), (2,4,5), (2,4,6)]

It will not have (2,2,5) and (2,2,6) since 2 is duplicate in here. How can I do that?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

itertools generally works on unique positions within inputs, not on unique values. So when you want to remove duplicate values, you generally have to either post-process the itertools result sequence, or "roll your own". Because post-processing can be very inefficient in this case, roll your own:

def uprod(*seqs):
    def inner(i):
        if i == n:
            yield tuple(result)
            return
        for elt in sets[i] - seen:
            seen.add(elt)
            result[i] = elt
            for t in inner(i+1):
                yield t
            seen.remove(elt)

    sets = [set(seq) for seq in seqs]
    n = len(sets)
    seen = set()
    result = [None] * n
    for t in inner(0):
        yield t

Then, e.g.,

>>> print list(uprod([1, 2, 1], [2, 4, 4], [5, 6, 5]))
[(1, 2, 5), (1, 2, 6), (1, 4, 5), (1, 4, 6), (2, 4, 5), (2, 4, 6)]
>>> print list(uprod([1], [1, 2], [1, 2, 4], [1, 5, 6]))
[(1, 2, 4, 5), (1, 2, 4, 6)]
>>> print list(uprod([1], [1, 2, 4], [1, 5, 6], [1]))
[]
>>> print list(uprod([1, 2], [3, 4]))
[(1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 3), (2, 4)]

This can be much more efficient, since a duplicate value is never even considered (neither within an input iterable, nor across them).

share|improve this answer
    
This is the answer what I was looking for. I kind of knew that I need to "roll my own" but I am newbie still in Python. Long way to go! Thanks for the answer. –  genclik27 Nov 2 '13 at 18:38
add comment
lis1 = [1,2]
lis2 = [2,4]
lis3 = [5,6]
from itertools import product
print [i for i in product(lis1,lis2,lis3) if len(set(i)) == 3]

Output

[(1, 2, 5), (1, 2, 6), (1, 4, 5), (1, 4, 6), (2, 4, 5), (2, 4, 6)]
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  thefourtheye Nov 2 '13 at 17:16
    
It is a solution but as I said in the problem, this method is not efficient. Assume you have 30 lists inside of lis and first two lists are [1,0],[1,2]. It could not find any solution unless it is done with (1,1,....) part. It is very time consuming. –  genclik27 Nov 2 '13 at 17:20
    
@genclik27 Could you please give me sample data, for which it will not work? –  thefourtheye Nov 2 '13 at 17:25
    
It will work but not efficient. Like, lis =[[1,2],[1,3],[4,5],[6,7],[8,9],[10,11],[12,13],[14,15],[16,17],[18,19],[20,21],‌​[22,23],[24,25],[26,27],[28,29],[30,31],[32,33],[34,35],[36,37],[38,39],[40,41],[‌​42,43],[44,45],[46,47]] –  genclik27 Nov 2 '13 at 17:27
    
product(*lis) will do first (1,1,...other elements) which is 2 to the power 20 iterations. Editted it should be 2 to the power 20, sorry. –  genclik27 Nov 2 '13 at 17:30
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.