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istream &operator>>(istream &in, iString &a) {
        string name;
        in>>name;
        iString b(name);
        delete a.chars;
        a=b;
        return in;
}
ostream &operator<<(ostream &out, const iString &a) {
        out<<a.chars<<endl;
        return out;
}

These are the operators I've written for the structure :

struct iString{
  char * chars;
  unsigned int length;
  unsigned int capacity;

  iString();
  iString(const char *);
  iString(const iString&);
  ~iString();

  iString &operator=(const iString&);
  };

// Add other declarations here:
iString operator+(const iString &a, const iString &b);
iString operator*(const iString &a, unsigned int scalar);
iString operator*(unsigned int scalar, const iString &a);
ostream &operator<<(ostream &out, const iString &b);
istream &operator>>(istream &in, iString &b);

Part of the error that I get :

error: no match for ‘operator>>’ in ‘std::cin >> * a[(((int)which) + -0x00000000000000061)]’
/usr/include/c++/4.4/istream:119: note: candidates are: std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator>>(std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>& (*)(std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>&)) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.4/istream:123: note:                 std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator>>(std::basic_ios<_CharT, _Traits>& (*)(std::basic_ios<_CharT, _Traits>&)) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.4/istream:130: note:                 std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator>>(std::ios_base& (*)(std::ios_base&)) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.4/istream:166: note:                 std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator>>(bool&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.4/istream:170: note:                 std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator>>(short int&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.4/istream:173: note:                 std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator>>(short unsigned int&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.4/istream:177: note:                 std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator>>(int&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.4/istream:180: note:                 std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator>>(unsigned int&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>

Part of the way I use the the structure in my client module (main):

switch(c) {
      case 'r':
        cin >> which;  // Reads a, b, c, or d
        a[which-'a'] = new iString;
        cin >> *(a[which-'a']);
        break;
      case 'w':
        cin >> which;  // Reads a, b, c, or d
        cout << *(a[which-'a']) << endl;
        break;
      case 'n':
        cin >> which >> temp;
        a[which-'a'] = new iString(temp.c_str());
        break;
      case 'i':
        cin >> op1 >> op2;
        a[op1-'a'] =

Notes : field chars refers to a vector heap allocated

Variable definitions in client module (main) :

int main() {
  bool done = false;
  string temp;
  iString *a[4];
  while(!done) {
    char c;
    char which;
    char op1;
    char op2;
    int int_op;
    cerr << "Command?" << endl;  // Valid commands:  r [a-d] string
                                 //                  wa, wb, wc, wd, q
                                 //                  s[a-d][a-d][a-d]
                                 //                  t [a-d] [a-d] string
                                 //                  m [a-d] int [a-d]
                                 //                  p [a-d] [a-d] int
                                 //                  n [a-d] string
                                 //                  i [a-d] [a-d]
                                 //                  = [a-d] [a-d]
                                 //                  f [a-d] 
                                 //                  e [a-d]
                                 //                  l [a-d]
    cin >> c;  // Reads r, p, m, s, w, n, i, e, f, q
    if (cin.eof()) break;

I use this definition for the assignment operator :

iString& iString::operator=(const iString &b) {
        chars=new char[strlen(b.chars)+1];
        strcpy(chars, b.chars);
        length=capacity=b.length;
        return *this;
}

Changed to delete [] ... ; the proper syntax for deleting an array and put "using namespace std" in the file that contains the definitions for the class and I get the new error: In file included from istring.cc:3:

istring.h:21: error: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before ‘&’ token
istring.h:22: error: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before ‘&’ token
istring.cc: In function ‘std::istream& operator>>(std::istream&, iString&)’:
istring.cc:59: error: no matching function for call to ‘iString::iString(std::string&)’
istring.cc:19: note: candidates are: iString::iString(const iString&)
istring.cc:11: note:                 iString::iString(const char*)
istring.cc:7: note:                 iString::iString()
istring.h:21: error: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before ‘&’ token
istring.h:22: error: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before ‘&’ token
share|improve this question
    
Add your variable declarations, I'm guessing that a is iString **a or something similar. –  D.Shawley Nov 2 '13 at 21:07
    
here you go sir! –  shooting-squirrel Nov 2 '13 at 21:12
    
delete a.chars; a=b; if it is necessary, the delete should be done in the assignment-operator of iString. –  dyp Nov 2 '13 at 21:13
    
@shooting-squirrel *(a[which-'a']) looks so weird. –  Netherwire Nov 2 '13 at 21:13
2  
delete a.chars; was chars allocated with new[]? Then it should be delete[]. Actually, that whole delete should be unnecessary, unless your operator= is borked. –  Cornstalks Nov 2 '13 at 21:14

2 Answers 2

You should try;

cout << a[which-'a'] << endl;
cin >> a[which-'a'];
share|improve this answer
    
I get what you mean, but shouldn't I be passing a reference to an iString object to << rather than a pointer? I know references are pointers but still they are a special type of pointers : meaningly type * cont p; –  shooting-squirrel Nov 2 '13 at 21:34

This is your problem: you are trying to call a constructor with a parameter name that is an std::string. You declared three constructors, but none of them take an std::string.

    string name;
    in>>name;
    iString b(name);

What if you tried the following, like you used elsewhere in your code?

    iString b(name.c_str());  // use iString(const char *);

Also, what if you made it explicit that you want an integer for indexing your array of pointers?

    cin >> which;  // Reads a, b, c, or d
    int index = which - 'a';           // explicitly create an int
    assert(0 <= index && index < 4);   // should probably do some checking of input
    a[index] = new iString;
    cin >> *(a[index]);
    break;

It would make your code cleaner, and avoid showing that offset in your compiler errors.

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