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I have two classes: a base class, Foo::Base and a derived class, Foo::Base::Sub. I want to have Foo::Base::Sub do some type and data checking on the constructor`s argument--a hash--before blessing it. I've tried overriding Foo::Base->new's constructor, doing the checks and then calling Foo::Base->new (since the code would be exactly the same):

package Foo::Base::Sub;

sub new {
    ...check argument's type and data...
    Foo::Base->new(%my_hash)
}

The problem is that by calling Foo::Base's constructor, the hash will now be blessed as a Foo::Base object and not a Foo::Base::Sub object. The obvious solution is simply to put the code from Foo::Base::new into Foo::Base::Sub::new but then I'm repeating code. The other thing is that Foo::Base is not mine--thus I'd like to avoid having to modify it after the module has loaded or forking it unnecessarily.

It seems to me that this problem must have come up before and so there must be a canonical solution. Moreover, it really touches on type coercion which is generally not an issue Perl.

So is there a simple modification or am I going about this the wrong way?

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1  
For type coercion, you may want to check out Moose if you haven't already. You can build a lot of "automatic" things into object and attribute construction. –  Ether Dec 29 '09 at 18:40
1  
Ive actually used Moose before but Im really trying to understand Perls guts a bit better. In the past Ive eschewed the OOP model in favour of imperative and pseudo-functional styles so this sort of thing has never come up. –  gvkv Dec 29 '09 at 19:38
1  
We cover this situation in Intermediate Perl :) –  brian d foy Dec 30 '09 at 11:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A standard Perl idiom is to use SUPER to call up the inheritance chain:

@Foo::Base::Sub::ISA = qw(Foo::Base);

sub new {
    my $package = shift;

    my $self = $package->SUPER::new();

    # Other subconstructor stuff here

    return $self;
}

As noted in the comments, Foo::Base's constructor must use the two-argument form of bless:

sub new {
    my $package = shift;

    my $self = bless {}, $package;

    # Other superconstructor stuff here

    return $self;
}

When the superclass' constructor is called, $package will be the subclass.

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2  
Note that this only works if the superclass constructor uses the two-argument form of bless in order explicitly set the package name of the new object. (This is why you should always use bless $self, $class) –  friedo Dec 29 '09 at 15:44
1  
Another way of saying all that is that either the constructor of Foo::Base is broken or it's not. –  innaM Dec 29 '09 at 15:51
4  
Use the 'parent' pragma rather than manipulating @ISA directly. –  Ether Dec 29 '09 at 18:37
1  
@Ether => everyone always says to use parent or use base but what is the reasoning behind that? i can't imagine that the usage of @ISA is going to change and our @ISA = qw/Foo::Base/ doesn't seem all that complicated and tells you exactly what is happening, and will explicitly complain about a base class not being required if it needs to be –  Eric Strom Dec 29 '09 at 19:40
1  
One other caveat to be aware of: $package->SUPER::new actually calls the superclass of the current package (that is, as designated by the latest package declaration, or main if there was none), not of $package. This difference can usually be ignored as $package is either the same as or a child of __PACKAGE__, but if you're doing some funky polymorphism you may see results that can take a while to debug. :) –  Ether Dec 29 '09 at 23:18

You might want to look at the various ways of invoking super. The SUPER module may work although I havent tried it myself.

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That's a good module, although its documentation is way out of date. Reading its source is quite educational, however. –  Ether Dec 29 '09 at 18:38
    
Interesting. I`m going to go over the source tonight. –  gvkv Dec 29 '09 at 19:32

I'm used to split this to two parts, new and init.

package Foo::Base;

sub new {
  my $class = shift;
  my $self = bless {}, $class;
  return $self->init(@_);
}

sub init {
  my ($self, @params) = @_;
  # do something initialization and checks
  return $self;
}

package Foo::Sub;

use base 'Foo::Base';

sub init {
  my ($self, @params) = @_;
  # do something initialization and checks
  $self = $self->SUPER::init(@params);
  # do something other if you wish
  return $self;
}

Note that 'Foo::Sub' doesn't implement new constructor.

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2  
Two-phased construction is less desirable if init() fails and you want the entire construction to fail as a result -- you'll end up with a partially-constructed object in an unknown and probably unusable state. –  Ether Dec 29 '09 at 18:38
3  
I like this answer from a pedagogical point of view but I'm loath to separate construction into two parts. Especially when calling class->new(...) is so standard. Thanks for your answer. –  gvkv Dec 29 '09 at 19:28
1  
When init fails then new fails because there is not any eval and init is called inside new. That's all. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Dec 30 '09 at 9:42
1  
When the init() fails, you just return nothing, which is the same thing that would happen if new() fails. –  brian d foy Dec 30 '09 at 10:25

While the 'super' answers do describe what you want here, you can (in the more general case) call method code in arbitrary packages by doing something like this:

 $object = Foo::Class->new(...);
 $object->Bar::Class::method(@args);

Bar::Class::method will proceed as normal, something like:

 package Bar::Class;
 sub method {
   my ($self, @args) = @_;

only $self will be of a different class than usual. Naturally, doing this instead of SUPER a lot is probably a sign you're doing something wrong.

Compare also NEXT and Perl 5.10's 'mro'.

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