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I'm still learning linked lists and have been trying to create a method to insert into a linked list.

I just want to know if this is the correct way of inserting? Also, how would I print the entire linked list, so it prints something like abc.

Here's what I have:

struct node {
   char value;
   struct node *next;
};

typedef struct node item;

void main() {
    InsertChar('a');
    InsertChar('b');
    InsertChar('c');
}

void InsertChar(char s) {
    item *curr, *head;

    head = NULL;

    curr = (item *)malloc(sizeof(item));
    curr->value = s;
    curr->next = head;
    head = curr;

    while(curr) {
        printf("%c\n", curr->value);
        curr = curr->next;
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

First of all, your function InsertChar is overwriting the value of head each time (head = curr), so you'll end up with a list of one item.

You need to declare something that will store head.

struct list
{
    struct node *head;
};

Now you can easily print your list by going through each node.

void PrintList(struct list* list)
{
    struct node *curr = list->head;

    while (curr != NULL)
    {
        printf("%c\n", curr->value);
        curr = curr->next;
    }
}

Now you need to modify InsertChar so that the last item in the list (how will you find it?) points to your new item. I'll leave that to you :)

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You need to look at the function definition void PrintList(struct list) { ... }. You have a type struct list but no variable name (OK in a prototype, not in a function definition). You should be able to use void PrintList(struct list *list) { ... } because structure tags are in a separate namespace from ordinary variable names. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 3 '13 at 18:41
    
You're right, i've corrected the code. Thanks! –  l19 Nov 3 '13 at 19:24

As you may have noticed, you have no means to access the list (if there was any) from outside InsertChar(). You don't use a global variable, nor do you input or output it.

A better implementation:

item * InsertChar(item ** phead, char s) {
    item * curr;

    // First, allocate a new item and fill it.
    curr = malloc(sizeof(item)); // no need to cast here
    if (curr) { // only if malloc() succeeds
        curr->value = s;
        curr->next = *phead;
        *phead = curr;
    }
    return curr;
}

// InsertChar() is only supposed to insert, not to print.
void PrintList(item * head) {
    item * curr = head;   
    while(curr) {
        printf("%c", curr->value); // omit the line break as you want abc
        curr = curr->next;
    }
    printf("\n"); // now the line break
    return;
    // alternative implementation for while loop:
    for(curr=head; curr; curr=curr->next) {
        printf("%c\n", curr->value);
    }
}

void FreeList(item * head) {
    item * curr = head;   
    while(curr) {
        item * next = curr->next; // read it out before freeing.
        free(curr);
        curr = next;
    }
}

so that you can do now

int main() {
    item * list = NULL; // empty for now, no contents.
    char success = 1;
    success = success && InsertChar(&list, 'a');
    success = success && InsertChar(&list, 'b');
    success = success && InsertChar(&list, 'c');
    if (!success) {
        printf("Oops?");
        FreeList(list);
        return 1;
    }
    PrintList(list);
    FreeList(list); // clean up.
}

Oops? I didn't test it, but it seems to me that it prints "cba". Why does it so? Well, InsertChar() puts everything to the start.

How to get around of this?

Either we can create an AppendChar() function. But this bears the danger that we into the trap of Schlemiel the Painter's algorithm: to start searching for the right place always from the start. Thus, I'll point out another approach:

int main() {
    item * list = NULL; // empty for now, no contents.
    item * cursor = InsertChar(&list, 'a');
    if (!cursor) goto error;
    // cursor now contains our first entry.
    // We put the next one to cursor->next:
    cursor = InsertChar(&cursor->next, 'b');
    if (!cursor) goto error;
    cursor = InsertChar(&cursor->next, 'c');
    if (!cursor) goto error;
    PrintList(list);
    FreeList(list); // clean up.
    return 0;
  error:
    printf("Oops?");
    FreeList(list);
    return 1;
}

I am not sure if I am right (didn't test it), but this should be the way to go.

If you are one of these who were taught that goto is evil under all circumstances, feel free to implement the error handling in a different way.

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