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It's a simple graph algorithm in c++

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <list>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class Graph {
    public:
        Graph(int v = 1):
            vertexs(v), edges(0) {
                adj = new list<int>[vertexs];
            }

        void test_put() {
            int iter_cnt = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < vertexs; i++) {
                for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
                    adj[i].push_back(iter_cnt++);
                }
            }
        }

        void test_print() {
            list<int>:: iterator iter;
            for (int i = 0; i < vertexs; i++) {
                for (iter = adj[i].begin(); iter != adj[i].end(); iter++) {
                    cout << *iter << "->";
                }
                cout << "###" << endl;
            }
        }

    private:
        int vertexs;
        int edges;
        list<int> adj[];
};

int main() {
    Graph g(10);
    g.test_put();
    g.test_print();
}

There's an error

ian@ubuntu:~/tmp$ g++ wgraph.cpp -o wg
wgraph.cpp: In constructor ‘Graph::Graph(int)’:
wgraph.cpp:12:44: error: incompatible types in assignment of ‘std::list<int>*’ to ‘std::list<int> [0]’

I am a java programmer, I don't know how to make proper constructor in c++.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This declaration

list<int> adj[];

produces a zero-length array, not an array whose size you can specify later.

Although you cannot do what you want to do directly, C++ standard library supplies a nice way to address this: use vector<list<int> > to solve the problem.

Declare the vector like this:

vector<list<int> > adj;

Initialize it like this:

Graph(int v = 1)
:  vertexs(v), edges(0), adj(vertexs) {
}

The rest of the usage stays the same as if it were an array - you can use square brackets to access the elements of the vector. Of course now your adj can be expanded as needed - all you have to do is calling push_back to add more elements.

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Your class should be like this: class Graph { public: Graph(int v = 1): vertexs(v), edges(0) { adj = new list[vertexs]; }

    void test_put() {
        int iter_cnt = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < vertexs; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
                adj[i].push_back(iter_cnt++);
            }
        }
    }

    void test_print() {
        list<int>:: iterator iter;
        for (int i = 0; i < vertexs; i++) {
            for (iter = adj[i].begin(); iter != adj[i].end(); iter++) {
                cout << *iter << "->";
            }
            cout << "###" << endl;
        }
    }

private:
    int vertexs;
    int edges;
    list<int> *adj;
};

Use list *adj; instead of list adj[];

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In addition to the dasblinkenlight's answer: you should indeed use std::vector instead of manually allocated array, and if you can use modern compiler with C++11 support (required features are found in GCC >= 4.6, Clang >= 3.0 and VC++ >= 2012), you can write your loops in much more concise way:

// member declaration
vector<list<int>> adj;

void test_put() {
    int iter_cnt = 0;
    for (auto &i : adj) {
        for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
            i.push_back(iter_cnt++);
        }
    }
}

// note the const modifier here: if the method does not modify
// object state, it's a good idea to declare it const
void test_print() const {
    for (const auto &i : adj) {
        for (const auto iter : i) {
            cout << iter << "->";
        }
        cout << "###" << endl;
    }
}

Also, probably no need to store vertex count explicitly in this case: adj.size() wrapped in a getter method would do.

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