Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wanted to create array of an objects. There will be many user objects and I want to keep these user objects in an array. I have a class called Data. I tried and searched a lot but couldn't find the solution. When user enters a new name the names of all objects changes with the given name, and at last when i print all the names it prints the last entered name for several times. Here is my code, it will be much helpful you to understand:

testClass.java

public class testClass {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        mainScreen();
    }

    public static void mainScreen(){    
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("1) Add a new user:");   
        int choice = scan.nextInt();

        switch(choice){
        case 1:
            System.out.println("Enter name:");
            String name = scan.next();
            Data.users[Data.count] = new Data(name);
                mainScreen();
            break;

        case 2:
            for(int i =0; i<=Data.count; i++){
                System.out.println(Data.users[i].name);
            }
            break;
        }   
    }
}

Data.java

public class Data {
    public static Data[] users = new Data[600];
    public static String name;
    public static int count = 0;

    public Data(String name) {
        users[count].name = name;
        count++;
    }   
}

I want that every object will have unique name, id, phone number, etc.. Does anybody have a suggestion for me?

share|improve this question
    
The way you're using Data is extremely fragile, because it relies on the classes using it to understand its internal structure. That's not a good idea, it will break in non-trivial situations. Data shouldn't be both a container for the user information and an array of those containers. Those two things should be separate, and there's no need to reinvent the second one (indeed, you've tagged your question arraylist and using one here wouldn't be a bad idea). –  T.J. Crowder Nov 3 '13 at 11:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

One solution is to remove the static modifier from name field in Data:

public static Data[] users = new Data[600];
public static int count = 0;
public String name;

public Data(String name) {
     this.name = name;
     Data.count++;
}

Also modify your for loop, because you'll get a NullPointerException, remove equals from the condition:

for(int i =0; i<Data.count; i++){
share|improve this answer

Because name is static field of your Data class like count and users. Remove static modifier from name field.

share|improve this answer
    
The way he's using Data relies on it being static. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 3 '13 at 11:01
    
He have to remove static from name field. I'll correct answer to be more clear. –  Nikolay Nov 3 '13 at 11:03
    
@ Nikolay: Ah, I see what you're saying. Yes, that is indeed the proximate cause, but Data needs to be completely refactored. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Nov 3 '13 at 11:05
    
@T.J.Crowder Of course, yes :) –  Nikolay Nov 3 '13 at 11:06

First you need to correct your Object structure

you have defined a class Data which contains a static array of Data Class itself

  1. I prefer to have data class as:

    class Data {
        private String name;
    
        public String getName() {
            return name;
        }
    
        public void setName(String name) {
            this.name = name;
        }
    }
    
  2. create a array of Data class in your testClass

  3. create new Data Object for each input and assign the name to the newly created Object using setName

  4. maintain the count variable in testClass. Increment it each time when you get a new input and use count variable to assign newly created Object to the Data array

share|improve this answer
    
@Crowder I thought of updating my answer, which will be difficult in the comment –  upog Nov 3 '13 at 11:07
1  
Yes, as of the edit, it's an answer. It's best not to post things that aren't answers, then edit them to become answers. Make the first version a complete answer. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 3 '13 at 11:16
    
@Crowder I tried my best to explain him, Even if you also had provided some code snippet, it would be easy for him :) –  upog Nov 3 '13 at 11:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.