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The following is my code, i intend to calculate how many times a list is modified, but the count seems to be wrong, my code is shown below:

t=(0,999999,"state")

cachLine = []

for x in range(0,2):
    cachLine.append(t);

cache = []
for x in range(0,1):
    cache.append(cachLine)

cacheList = []

for x in range(0,8):
    cacheList.append(cache)

count=0

for cacheI,cache in enumerate(cacheList):
    for clI,cl in enumerate(cache):
        for bI,(valid, address, state) in enumerate(cl):

            if state =='state': 
                cacheList[cacheI][clI][bI] = (valid, address,'invalid')
                count +=1
print(count)

The count is 2 in this case, which is not as expected, it should be 16

However, if i change the order of the count+=1 to

for cacheI,cache in enumerate(cacheList):
    for clI,cl in enumerate(cache):
        for bI,(valid, address, state) in enumerate(cl):
            count +=1    
            if state =='state': 
                cacheList[cacheI][clI][bI] = (valid, address,'invalid')

print(count)

I get the correct count of 16. In any of the two case, i get an output of cacheList:

[[[(0, 999999, 'invalid'), (0, 999999, 'invalid')]], [[(0, 999999, 'invalid'), (0, 999999, 'invalid')]], [[(0, 999999, 'invalid'), (0, 999999, 'invalid')]], [[(0, 999999, 'invalid'), (0, 999999, 'invalid')]], [[(0, 999999, 'invalid'), (0, 999999, 'invalid')]], [[(0, 999999, 'invalid'), (0, 999999, 'invalid')]], [[(0, 999999, 'invalid'), (0, 999999, 'invalid')]], [[(0, 999999, 'invalid'), (0, 999999, 'invalid')]]]

which is 16 of tuples (0, 999999, 'invalid').

What is wrong with count in the first code?

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3 Answers 3

You should copy your lists before appending them:

import copy

cache = []
for x in range(0,1):
    cache.append(copy.deepcopy(cachLine))

cacheList = []

for x in range(0,8):
    cacheList.append(copy.deepcopy(cache))
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Curious...

If you change "state" to anything else, for example State, foo or xyzzy, it works and you don't get the "invalid" fields in cacheList.

It appears "state" is a keyword or named parameter somewhere inside enumerate and something gets broken. Not sure if this helps at all.

Hannu

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In your code, you append 8 time the SAME cache, containing the SAME cacheline. Your cacheList ultimately contains a bunch of reference to the exact same objet: a list of two tuples

So the first time you call cacheList[cacheI][clI][bI] = (valid, address,'invalid'), you modify this common object. count = 1 and each cacheline is now:

[(0,999999,"state"), (0,999999,"invalid")]

After the second time, count = 2 and cacheline is:

[(0,999999,"invalid"), (0,999999,"invalid")]

After the first completion of your innerloop, every "state" has turned into "invalid". Therefore, your count stops at 2.

The solution is indeed to use the copy module, as it will create new objects, instead of just passing a reference.

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