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Why in the next code c = 1 ?

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int i = 65537;
    char c = (char)i;
    printf("c = %d\n",c); /* why c =1 */
    return(0);
}
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3  
What do you expect it to be? –  Barmar Nov 3 '13 at 18:04
    
Because 65537 is binary 10000000000000001. –  Igor R. Nov 3 '13 at 18:06
2  
@Joachim Pileborg How is this type-cast related to endianness?! It will result in 1 both on big-endian, and on little-endian. –  Igor R. Nov 3 '13 at 18:07
    
no. I need explanation why c = 1 , why (char)I = int I 65537 = c=1 –  user2948078 Nov 3 '13 at 18:08
1  
Yes, the comments are actually explaining this behavior. See the answers for more details. –  m0skit0 Nov 3 '13 at 18:09

4 Answers 4

65537 is 0x10001 (in hexadecimal, 10000000000000001 in binary). If you cast this value to char, which is only one byte long, you will only be taking the lowest (least-significant) byte from 0x1001, which is 0x01 = 1 in decimal.

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Char stores only 1 byte. By assigning c to an int value, only the lowest byte is assigned.

65537 = 256 * 256 + 1.

Hence c = 1.

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The char type is only 8 bits long, while int has 32 bits. When you assign an int variable to a char, the value is cut to just the 8 least significant bits.

65537 is in binary 10000000 000000001

So, the least significant byte is 00000001

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4  
"while int has 32 bits" This actually depends on architecture. –  m0skit0 Nov 3 '13 at 18:12
    
@m0skit0 well, actually the whole behavior that OP encountered is platform-dependent. Because on some platforms char can have much more than 8 bit, so 65537 won't be truncated. –  Igor R. Nov 3 '13 at 18:28
    
Thanks for the correction. @IgorR, I thought char was 1 byte long by definition in C. On a platform that char is larger than 8 bits, how would I create something 1 byte long? –  dettonijr Nov 3 '13 at 18:45
1  
char is byte (i.e. the Standard requires that sizeof(char) == 1), but byte is not necessarily 8 bits. Eg., on systems where char has 9 bits, there's no type having exactly 8 bits (with no padding). –  Igor R. Nov 3 '13 at 19:03

This for casting from int to char: int i = 65537; char c = (char)i;

First four bytes are casted here from 10000000000000001: this is why it coming as 1 if you use 65539 (10000000000000011), char will be 3

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