Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I write this code:

for $i (1..3) { 
 $j = $i;
print $j;
}  

it works.

And this code will work:

$code = "  
 for $i (1..3) { 
  #### $j = $i;
  print $j;
}  
eval $code  

But if I try to write it like this:

$code = "
for $i (1..3) { 
$j = $i;
print $j;
 }  
eval $code  

It will catch an error, why? who can help me?

share|improve this question
1  
is this your actual code? don't looks like second one is runnable –  Suic Nov 3 '13 at 18:45
5  
Never ever say "an error" without specifying exactly which error. –  TLP Nov 3 '13 at 19:05
4  
Always use use strict; use warnings;! –  ikegami Nov 3 '13 at 19:22
1  
and look at $@ to see what the error is –  ysth Nov 3 '13 at 19:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are missing a quote :

$code = '
for $i (1..3) { 
    $j = $i;
    print $j;
}';
eval $code;

and 'single quotes' here are mandatory to not expand variables before the eval call.

share|improve this answer

The second one works purely by accident. Your double-quoted string is interpolating empty values for $i and $j and you're actually running

for  (1..3) {
  ### = 
  print ;
}

which coincidentally works because for will assign to $_ if you don't name a variable, and print will print $_ by default. When you remove the comment marker, the lone equals sign causes a syntax error.

If you had used strict it would have prevented you from compiling the broken code in the first place, and if you had used warnings it would have at least warned you about the use of the uninitialized variables $i and $j in string interpolation.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.