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I have unsorted pairs of integers, which represent some time intervals (first number is always less than the second one). The problem is to assign an integer, so called channel number(0..x) to each time interval, so that the intervals which do not collide will share the same channel. The least possible number of channels should be used.

For example those intervals will use 2 channels:

50 100 //1

10 70 //0

80 200 //0

I've implemented it using counting sort, to sort the input by the first column, and then used linear search to find chains of pairs, which follow one another. I also first of all copy the input *const*array to the new one, and at the end, assign values to the correct positions in the input array.

Yes, it is an assignment I've got from the University, and its implemented already, but can anybody please tell me how to make the code faster ? Which algorithm to use, so that sorting, chaining of pairs will be as fast as possible ? The length of the input array is up to 10 millions elements.

Here is the code:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;   

struct TPhone
 {
   unsigned int    m_TimeFrom;
   unsigned int    m_TimeTo;
   unsigned int    m_Channel;
 };

 class TElement
 {
 public:

  TPhone m_data;
  int index;

  TElement(TPhone  * const data, int index_)
  {
    m_data.m_TimeFrom=data->m_TimeFrom;
    m_data.m_TimeTo=data->m_TimeTo;
    m_data.m_Channel=-1;
    index=index_;
  }
  TElement()
  {
  }
 };

int FindNext(TElement** sorted_general_array, int general_array_size, int index_from)
{
  for (int i=index_from+1; i<general_array_size; i++ )
  {
    if (sorted_general_array[i]->m_data.m_TimeFrom > sorted_general_array[index_from]->m_data.m_TimeTo)
    {
      if (sorted_general_array[i]->m_data.m_Channel==(unsigned int)-1)
      {
        return i;
      }
    }
  }
  return -1;
}

int AssignChannels(TElement **sorted_general_array, int general_array_size)
{
  int current_channel=-1;
  for (int i=0; i<general_array_size; i++)
    {
      if (sorted_general_array[i]->m_data.m_Channel==(unsigned int)-1)
      {
        current_channel++;
        sorted_general_array[i]->m_data.m_Channel=current_channel;
        //cout << sorted_general_array[i]->m_data.m_TimeFrom << " " << sorted_general_array[i]->m_data.m_TimeTo << " " << sorted_general_array[i]->m_data.m_Channel << endl;
        int next_greater=i;
        while (1)
        {
          next_greater=FindNext(sorted_general_array,general_array_size,next_greater);
          if (next_greater!=-1)
          {
            sorted_general_array[next_greater]->m_data.m_Channel=current_channel;
            //cout << sorted_general_array[next_greater]->m_data.m_TimeFrom << " " << sorted_general_array[next_greater]->m_data.m_TimeTo << " " << sorted_general_array[next_greater]->m_data.m_Channel << endl;
          }
          else
          {
            break;
          } 
        }
      }
    }
    return current_channel;
}

int AllocChannels ( TPhone  * const * req, int reqNr )
 {
  //initialize
  int count_array_size=1700000;
  int * count_array;
  count_array=new int [count_array_size];
  for (int i=0; i<count_array_size; i++)
  {
     count_array[i]=0;
  }
  //
  int general_array_size=reqNr;
  TElement ** general_array;
  general_array=new TElement *[general_array_size];
  for (int i=0; i<general_array_size; i++)
  {
    general_array[i]= new TElement(req[i],i);
  }
  //--------------------------------------------------
  //counting sort
  //count number of each element
  for (int i=0; i<general_array_size; i++)
  {
    count_array[general_array[i]->m_data.m_TimeFrom]++;
  }
  //modify array to find postiions
  for (int i=0; i<count_array_size-1; i++)
  {
    count_array[i+1]=count_array[i+1]+count_array[i];
  }
  //make output array, and fill in the sorted data
  TElement ** sorted_general_array;
  sorted_general_array=new TElement *[general_array_size];

  for (int i=0; i <general_array_size; i++)
  {
    int insert_position=count_array[general_array[i]->m_data.m_TimeFrom]-1;
    sorted_general_array[insert_position]=new TElement;

    //cout << "inserting " << general_array[i]->m_data.m_TimeFrom << " to " << insert_position << endl;
    sorted_general_array[insert_position]->m_data.m_TimeFrom=general_array[i]->m_data.m_TimeFrom;
    sorted_general_array[insert_position]->m_data.m_TimeTo=general_array[i]->m_data.m_TimeTo;
    sorted_general_array[insert_position]->m_data.m_Channel=general_array[i]->m_data.m_Channel;
    sorted_general_array[insert_position]->index=general_array[i]->index;


    count_array[general_array[i]->m_data.m_TimeFrom]--;
    delete  general_array[i];
  }
  //free memory which is no longer needed
  delete [] general_array;
  delete [] count_array;
  //--------------------------------------------------

  int channels_number=AssignChannels(sorted_general_array,general_array_size);
  if (channels_number==-1)
  {
    channels_number=0;
  }
  else
  {
    channels_number++;
  }

  //output
  for (int i=0; i<general_array_size; i++)
  {
    req[sorted_general_array[i]->index]->m_Channel=sorted_general_array[i]->m_data.m_Channel;
  }


  //free memory and return
  for (int i=0; i<general_array_size; i++)
  {
    delete sorted_general_array[i];
  }
  delete [] sorted_general_array;

  return channels_number;
 }                                                             


int main ( int argc, char * argv [] )
 {
   TPhone ** ptr;
   int cnt, chnl;

   if ( ! (cin >> cnt) ) return 1;

   ptr = new TPhone * [ cnt ];
   for ( int i = 0; i < cnt; i ++ )
    {
      TPhone * n = new TPhone;
      if ( ! (cin >> n -> m_TimeFrom >> n -> m_TimeTo) ) return 1;
      ptr[i] = n;
    }

   chnl = AllocChannels ( ptr, cnt );

   cout << chnl << endl;
   for ( int i = 0; i < cnt; i ++ )
    {
      cout << ptr[i] -> m_Channel << endl;
      delete ptr[i];
    }
   delete [] ptr; 
   return 0;
  }
share|improve this question
    
What's the max possible number range for those intervals? I suppose it's small because you used counting sort. The question is - how small is it? –  dreamzor Nov 3 '13 at 19:41
    
The range is actually 0 to 1 million –  John Nov 3 '13 at 19:42
    
Why do you think that the sorting itself is the bottleneck here? You can't do faster than counting sort when element values are quite small and 10 times less than maximum array size. –  dreamzor Nov 3 '13 at 19:44
    
I'm not sure if the problem is with the sorting or not. If it's possible to do some better sorting I will work on it, if not then I will look through the rest of the code. Do you think that I should try a different sort or not ? –  John Nov 3 '13 at 19:46
    
I though about it. Here I have search n * n times for the elements. Any idea how to improve it ? –  John Nov 3 '13 at 19:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want your algorithm to be fast, you should reduce searching as much as possible. Also, you do not need to know which intervals are "chained together" for determining a correct channel for each (i. e. not using more channels than absolutely necessary). Here are the steps/techniques I would use for maximum performance:

  1. Define your interval class like this, adding the two inline function definitions (that I use a struct for the TimeDescriptor is simply a matter of style, not that this code is exactly stylish, though):

    typedef struct TimeDescriptor {
        unsigned time;
        bool isEnd;
    } TimeDescriptor;
    
    class TimeInterval {
        public:
            TimeDescriptor start, end;
            unsigned channel;
    
            TimeInterval(unsigned startTime, unsigned endTime) {
                start = (TimeDescriptor){ startTime, false };
                end = (TimeDescriptor){ endTime, true };
            }
    }
    
    inline TimeInterval* getInterval(TimeDescriptor* me) {
        return (me->isEnd) ? (TimeInterval*)(me - 1) : (TimeInterval*)me;
    }
    
    inline TimeDescriptor* getOther(TimeDescriptor* me) {
        return (me->isEnd) ? (me - 1) : (me + 1);
    }
    
  2. Create an array of pointers to all TimeDescriptors, two for each TimeInterval (one for the start, the other for the end).

  3. Sort this array of TimeDescriptor pointers by the time. Make sure that you use the isEnd flag as a secondary sort key. I'm not sure how interval collisions are defined, i. e. whether the two intervals (20, 30) and (30, 40) clash or not, if they clash, sort end times after start times with the same value, if they do not clash, sort end times before start times with the same value.

    In any case, I would advise to just use a standard quicksort implementation to sort your array.

  4. Create a stack for unused channel numbers. The important things about this stack are: It must allow you to fetch/push a channel number in constant time, ideally by updating no more than two numbers in memory; and it must be bottomless, i. e. it must allow you to pop any number of values, producing an ascending sequence of integers.

    The easiest way to implement such a stack, is probably to program a small class that uses an std::vector<unsigned> to store the free channels, and that keeps track of the largest channel number ever used. Whenever a pop request cannot be serviced from the internal storage, a new channel number is produced by incrementing the largest channel number by one.

  5. Walk through your sorted array of TimeDescriptors. Every time you encounter a start time, fetch a channel number, and store it in the corresponding TimeInterval (using getInterval()). Every time you encounter an end time, push its channel number back onto the free channel array.

  6. When you are through, your free channel stack will tell you the maximum number of channels you used simultaneously, and every TimeInterval will contain the correct channel number to use. You can even efficiently compute all the interval chains that share a channel by simply resorting the TimeInterval array by the channel number...

share|improve this answer

This question already has an accepted answer. However I wanted to describe a slightly different approach than the accepted answer.

You've Got To Measure

You aren't going to be able to tell anything about performance without measuring. And to measure we need test cases. So it seems to me that the first job is to create a program that will generate test cases.

I made a whole bunch of assumptions, which may be incorrect, and generated the following code to generate test cases:

#include <iostream>
#include <random>

int
main()
{
    const unsigned N = 10000000;
    std::mt19937_64 eng(0);
    std::uniform_int_distribution<unsigned> start_time(0, N);
    std::chi_squared_distribution<> duration(4);
    std::cout << N << '\n';
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < N;)
    {
        unsigned st = start_time(eng);
        unsigned et = st + static_cast<unsigned>(duration(eng));
        if (et > st)
        {
            std::cout << st << ' ' << et << '\n';
            ++i;
        }
    }
}

One can vary the value of N, the range of the seeding on the random number engine (if not the choice of random number engine), the range of start times, and the type/shape of the probability distribution of time durations. I pulled each of these choices out of thin air. Your professor may have better ideas on the generation of reasonable test cases for this problem. But measuring something is better than measuring nothing.

Make use of the std::lib

The standard library is full of containers and algorithms. Not only is this code debugged, it is efficient. Re-use of this code is good coding style because:

  1. It teaches you to recognize containers, and when to use what container.
  2. It teaches you to recognize algorithms, and when to use what algorithm.
  3. It can help you identify the need for, and code your own containers and algorithms when they are not supplied by the std:lib.
  4. It makes your code much easier to read for others, because they will know about std-defined containers and algorithms.
  5. It makes your code much easier to debug, because the probability of bugs in your code is much higher than the probability of bugs in the std::lib (though neither probability is zero).

For Example

I augmented your TPhone struct with I/O to ease the complexity of the I/O you are doing in main:

friend
std::istream&
operator>>(std::istream& is, TPhone& p)
{
    return is >> p.m_TimeFrom >> p.m_TimeTo;
}

friend
std::ostream&
operator<<(std::ostream& os, const TPhone& p)
{
    return os << '{' <<  p.m_TimeFrom << ", "
                     <<  p.m_TimeTo << ", "
                     << p.m_Channel << '}';
}

And I chose vector<TPhone> to hold all the calls. This simplifies this:

int main ( int argc, char * argv [] )
 {
   TPhone ** ptr;
   int cnt, chnl;

   if ( ! (cin >> cnt) ) return 1;

   ptr = new TPhone * [ cnt ];
   for ( int i = 0; i < cnt; i ++ )
    {
      TPhone * n = new TPhone;
      if ( ! (cin >> n -> m_TimeFrom >> n -> m_TimeTo) ) return 1;
      ptr[i] = n;
    }

Down to this:

int main()
{
    using namespace std;
    vector<TPhone> ptr;
    int cnt;
    if (!(cin >> cnt)) return 1;
    ptr.reserve(cnt);
    for (int i = 0; i < cnt; ++i)
    {
        TPhone n;
        if (!(cin >> n)) return 1;
        ptr.push_back(n);
    }

And as it turns out my version is more efficient than yours. I get this efficiency "for free", just by learning how to use std::vector.

AllocChannels can now take a std::vector<TPhone>&:

int
AllocChannels(std::vector<TPhone>& ptr)

In here I used the simplest possible algorithm I could think of. Not because I thought it might be fastest, but because you need a baseline to measure against. And as it turns out, simple is not always slow…

int
AllocChannels(std::vector<TPhone>& ptr)
{
    using namespace std;
    if (ptr.size() == 0)
        return 0;
    // sort TPhone's by x.m_TimeFrom
    sort(ptr.begin(), ptr.end(), [](const TPhone& x, const TPhone& y)
                                       {
                                           return x.m_TimeFrom < y.m_TimeFrom;
                                       });
   // Create channel 0 and mark it as busy by the ptr[0] until ptr[0].m_TimeTo
    vector<unsigned> channels(1, ptr.front().m_TimeTo);
    ptr.front().m_Channel = 0;
   // For each call after the first one ...
    for (auto i = next(ptr.begin()); i != ptr.end(); ++i)
    {
        // Find the first channel that isn't busy at this m_TimeFrom
        auto j = find_if(channels.begin(), channels.end(),
                                           [&](unsigned tf)
                                             {
                                                 return tf < i->m_TimeFrom;
                                             });
        if (j != channels.end())
        {
           // Found a non-busy channel, record it in use for this call
           i->m_Channel = j - channels.begin();
           // Mark the channel busy until m_TimeTo
           *j = i->m_TimeTo;
        }
        else
        {
            // Record a new channel for this call
            i->m_Channel = channels.size();
            // Create a new channel and mark it busy until m_TimeTo
            channels.push_back(i->m_TimeTo);
        }
    }
    return channels.size();
}

I've used a few C++11 features because they are convenient (such as auto and lambdas). If you do not have these features available to you, they are easy to work around in C++03. The basic algorithm I've used is to just sort by m_TimeFrom, and then do a linear walk through the sorted list of calls, and for each call a linear search through the set of channels looking for one that is not in use (creating a new one if all are in use). Note the use of the standard algorithms sort and find_if. No sense in re-implementing these, especially for a base-line test case.

I used <chrono> to time everything:

auto t0 = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
int chnl = AllocChannels(ptr);
auto t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();

I instrumented your code in exactly the same way so that I could test both. Here are my results, first generating a test case of length = {100, 1000, 10000, 100000, 1000000, 10000000}, and for each length running first your code then mine, both using this output only:

cout << "#intervals = " << cnt << '\n';
cout << "#channels = " << chnl << '\n';
cout << "time = " << chrono::duration<double>(t1-t0).count() << "s\n";

Here is what I got:

$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out > test.dat
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
#intervals = 100
#channels = 10
time = 0.00565518s
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
#intervals = 100
#channels = 10
time = 6.934e-06s

$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out > test.dat
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
#intervals = 1000
#channels = 17
time = 0.00578557s
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
#intervals = 1000
#channels = 17
time = 5.4779e-05s

$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out > test.dat
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
#intervals = 10000
#channels = 16
time = 0.00801314s
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
#intervals = 10000
#channels = 16
time = 0.000656864s

$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out > test.dat
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
#intervals = 100000
#channels = 18
time = 0.0418109s
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
#intervals = 100000
#channels = 18
time = 0.00788054s

$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out > test.dat
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
#intervals = 1000000
#channels = 19
time = 0.688571s
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
#intervals = 1000000
#channels = 19
time = 0.093764s

$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out > test.dat
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
Segmentation fault: 11
$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -O3
$ a.out < test.dat
#intervals = 10000000
#channels = 21
time = 1.07429s

Summary

No one here, including myself, predicted that the most simplistic solution would consistently beat your first try by whopping amounts. This could be a characteristic of the test cases I've generated. That would be something else for you to study by generating other test cases to measure against.

I do not know the cause of the Segmentation fault for your case with N = 10000000. I did not take the time to study your code. Quite frankly, I find your code complicated.

I neglected to write a correctness test. That should actually have been my first step. Is the output correct? I got lazy and simply glanced at the N == 100 case to see if it looked right.

Because of the re-use of std::containers and algorithms, my code will actually be much easier to tweak for performance than yours. For example you could try std::lower_bound (a binary search) in place of std::find_if, and measure if it improves things or not (I'm betting not, but you should measure, and with a test.dat that you have respect for).

Factor your code into containers and algorithms. Reuse std-defined containers and algorithms when they exist, else create ones of your own that can be reused in your future coding. As a student, I expect the std-defined ones to be adequate for most of your use cases.

Always test for correctness (as I failed to do so here :-)) Don't assume anything about performance without measuring. Binary searching is not always faster than linear searching, even though it has a better asymptotic complexity. And the input data can strongly impact the performance of your algorithms. Learn how to generate varied input data to get a feel for how your algorithms can be impacted. <random> is great for this task.

share|improve this answer

Store the entries in a std::vector<TPhone> instead of in a TPhone **. This will layout consecutive TPhone objects consecutively in memory, leading to fewer cache misses.

Experiment with other data types than unsigned int for the members of TPhone. See <cstdint> for types that you can try.

share|improve this answer

If you have the collection sorted, why would you use a linear search? Use a binary search.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, I will try that. Is it possible to use something faster than binary search here ? –  John Nov 3 '13 at 20:43
    
I don't know the problem domain. Can you use a hash map? If your data set is large you will already get an enormous improvement from binary search. –  EJP Nov 3 '13 at 21:32

Let [ai, bi) be your intervals, i = 1, ..., n. You want to design a function channel(i) that returns a channel number for each of your n intervals.

The only constraint you have is that no two intersecting intervals can be on the same channel. This corresponds to an undirected graph where your intervals are vertices and there is an edge between two vertices if and only if the corresponding intervals intersect.

You can assign a channel C to a particular set of vertices (intervals) if those vertices form an independent set.

You want to find a set of independent sets of this form, where the union of all of them covers the graph, and they are pairwise disjoint. You want as few independent sets as possible.

The (related) problem of finding a maximum independent set is NP-complete. So I don't think you should expect to find a polynomial-time algorithm for finding the solution that gives you the minimum number of channels.

More realistic expectations come in one of two forms: either (A) spend super-polynomial time to solve the problem, or (B) use an approximation algorithm that may not give you a global optimum.

For (B) you can do this:

feasible(M)

    initialize M empty channels (lists of intervals)

    sort intervals by a_i value

    for each interval I = [a_i, b_i):

        insert it into the channel for which the most recent
        interval is closest to the current interval (but not intersecting)

        if I cannot be inserted at the end of any channel, return false

    return true //the M channels are a feasible solution

Now using this procedure you can exponential search for the minimum M for which feasible returns true.

Try M = 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, ... until you hit the first M = 2k such that feasible(M) returns true. Then do binary search between 2k - 1 and 2k to find the minimum M.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you advice me some algorithm for B ? (an approximation algorithm that may not give you a global optimum.) I have a lot of memory, but time is very limited. –  John Nov 3 '13 at 19:55
    
@John Updated the answer with an algorithm for (B). –  Timothy Shields Nov 3 '13 at 21:20
    
I disagree on your assertion about the complexity of the problem. It may be correct that finding a maximum independent set is NP-complete in the general case, but the problem is a special case in which a very efficient algorithm exists. For details, see my answer, it's of complexity O(n log n). –  cmaster Nov 3 '13 at 22:21
    
@cmaster Without a proof that your answer finds the optimal solution, I'm not immediately convinced. However it looks like you spent more time thinking about it so you're probably right. –  Timothy Shields Nov 4 '13 at 0:00
    
@cmaster After a second look at your solution, I think you're actually not right. I don't see any reason why that algorithm will always get you the optimal number of channels. It's a greedy algorithm. –  Timothy Shields Nov 4 '13 at 0:58

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