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Consider the following code:

using System.Threading;
public class BaseClass {
    private Timer tmrWork;

    public BaseClass() {
        // read values from config
        tmrWork = new Timer(tmrWork_Tick, null, 1, SomeInterval);
    }

    private void tmrWork_Tick(object state)
    {
        DoWork();
    } 

    protected abstract void DoWork();
}

public class ChildClass: BaseClass {
    public ChildClass() {
        // do a bunch of stuff here
        // potentially time consuming
    }

    protected override void DoWork() {
        // do stuff
    }
}

The intent here is this: based on config values, classes that inherit from the BaseClass will have a method called DoWork called at a certain point.

Because that method gets called on a separate thread (due to usage of the System.Threading.Timer) sometimes DoWork gets called before the ChildClass constructor has finished executing.

How can I make sure that the child constructor has completed until the DoWork gets called?
P.S. The code is in a Windows service.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The simplest I could think of


public class BaseClass {
    private Timer tmrWork;
    protected bool IsReady;

    public BaseClass() {
        // read values from config
        tmrWork = new Timer(tmrWork_Tick, null, 1, SomeInterval);
    }

    private void tmrWork_Tick(object state)
    {
        if (IsReady)
            DoWork();
    } 

    protected abstract void DoWork();
}

public class ChildClass: BaseClass {
    public ChildClass() {
        // do a bunch of stuff here
        // potentially time consuming
        IsReady = true;
    }

    protected override void DoWork() {
        // do stuff
    }
}

Or better make IsReady abstract method so that children have to implement it. In solution above (and Daniel's answer) there's always possibility that child class forgets to set the flag (call Initialize)

But really I think there may be something wrong with your design. I don't think Timer should be contained by BaseClass. This way you can have

new ChildClass();

and now suddenly some threads do some work in background. To me it looks like Timer is some kind of infrastructure code that runs jobs which are implemented in different classes as as such should be extracted from BaseClass. Current solution is also not testable.

But of course I may be wrong because I don't know what real code is doing.

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The safest method is to not initialize the timer when the object is constructed, but instead to provide either an Enabled property or a Start() method to explicitly start the timer after the object is fully initialized. This property/method is set/called by the code that creates the new object, and not from within the constructor itself.

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The order of execution of constructors is opposite to that of initialisers, so I would do your setup work in an initialiser.

public class BaseClass {
    private Timer tmrWork;

    public BaseClass() {
        // read values from config
        tmrWork = new Timer(tmrWork_Tick, null, 1, SomeInterval);
        lock (syncObject)
            Init();
    }

    protected abstract void Init();

    private void tmrWork_Tick(object state)
    {
        lock (syncObject)
            DoWork();
    } 

    protected abstract void DoWork();
}


public class ChildClass: BaseClass {
    private object syncObject = new object();

    protected override void Init() {
        lock (syncObject) {
            // do a bunch of stuff here
            // potentially time consuming
        }
    }

    protected override void DoWork() {
        // do stuff
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd rather the child client classes would not have to think about all the complexity of how DoWork gets executed. The model I am going for is a programmer overrides the DoWork method and doesn't have to think about all the complexity of how it was called. –  AngryHacker Nov 3 '13 at 20:15
    
Oh, I see. So actually the lock should go inside tmrWork_Tick, and then it is a case of figuring out the execution sequence of the derived constructor. There will surely be a way. –  Rob Lyndon Nov 3 '13 at 20:47

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