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I've got a geojson file with a bunch of points. I use Google Maps to get routing information between these points (using the JS API v3). Unfortunately I'm getting the OVER_QUERY_LIMIT error status back because I'm doing too many routing requests at a time.

For now I've solved it by delaying my routing requests. But that is not a long term solution. It takes too long to draw the full route now.

What I want to do is cache the routes. The only time I'd need to invalidate the cache is when the geojson file is updated (let's say this happens once a week maybe).

It's a static site. So all the logic is client side JavaScript. The site is hosted as a GitHub project page.

Any ideas on how I could implement the caching? Could Jekyll (github pages tool) help in any way? I don't know exactly what it does. Or some Travis-CI script?

EDIT: Just to clarify; It'd be enough to cache just the polyline and then draw that. I don't need the actual driving directions. I also don't need to be able to edit the route by drag-n-drop.

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you may want to take a look at the Terms of Services of Maps Api. Search for (b) No Pre-Fetching, Caching, or Storage of Content and check if what you are trying to do is not violating the TOS (before you invest too much time on your app) –  pascal Nov 3 '13 at 21:13
    
Thanks for the heads up, but I think I'm fine. The very first exemption from the rule is "except that you may store: (i) limited amounts of Content for the purpose of improving the performance of your Maps API Implementation" which is exactly my goal. –  Tobbe Nov 3 '13 at 21:36
    
one option (but would just be the polyline, none of interactive functionality). another option discussed in this post –  geocodezip Nov 4 '13 at 1:49
    
The polyline is enough. But the real question is how to store it since github pages doesn't provide you with a database to store anything in. –  Tobbe Nov 4 '13 at 5:32

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