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I'm getting the compiler error "error: wall is not a member of Grid" on the first two lines of the default constructor for grid. I'm not sure why it is saying that as I defined both wall and grid in my header file! I've also tried using this->wall, Grid::wall and an initialization list. Here's the code:

Grid::Grid() {
    this->wall = Species("wall");
    this->empty = Species("empty");
    Grid::turn_number = 0;
    int a,b;
    for(a= 0; a < 100; a++)
        for(b = 0; b< 100; b++) {
            Creature empty_creature = Creature(Grid::empty,a,b,NORTH,this);
            ((Grid::map)[a][b]) = empty_creature;
        }
    Grid::width = 0;
    Grid::height = 0;
}

I get the same error when I change my default constructor to use an initialization list:

Grid::Grid()
: width(0), height(0), turn_number(0), wall("wall"), empty("empty"){
    int a,b;
    for(a= 0; a < 100; a++)
        for(b = 0; b< 100; b++) {
            Creature empty_creature = Creature(Grid::empty,a,b,NORTH,this);
            ((Grid::map)[a][b]) = empty_creature;
        }
}

In the Header file:

class Grid {
protected:
    Creature map[100][100];
    int width,height;
    int turn_number;
    Species empty;
    Species wall;
public:
    Grid();
    Grid(int _width, int _height);
    void addCreature(Species &_species, int x, int y, Direction orientation);
    void addWall(int x, int y);
    void takeTurn();
    void infect(int x, int y, Direction orientation, Species &_species);
    void hop(int x, int y, Direction orientation);
    bool ifWall(int x, int y, Direction orientation);
    bool ifEnemy(int x, int y, Direction orientation, Species &_species);
    bool ifEmpty(int x, int y, Direction orientation);
    void print();
};

Here's the rest of my compiler errors (asked for in comments). Sorry for the formatting, my computer spits out weird characters for some reason.

Darwin.c++: In constructor ‘Grid::Grid()’:
Darwin.c++:8:40: error: class ‘Grid’ does not have any field named ‘wall’
Darwin.c++:8:54: error: class ‘Grid’ does not have any field named ‘empty’
Darwin.c++:12:39: error: ‘empty’ is not a member of ‘Grid’
Darwin.c++: In constructor ‘Grid::Grid(int, int)’:
Darwin.c++:17:86: error: class ‘Grid’ does not have any field named ‘wall’
Darwin.c++:17:99: error: class ‘Grid’ does not have any field named ‘empty’
Darwin.c++:21:39: error: ‘empty’ is not a member of ‘Grid’
Darwin.c++: In member function ‘void Grid::addWall(int, int)’:
Darwin.c++:32:31: error: ‘wall’ is not a member of ‘Grid’
Darwin.h:35:10: error: field ‘empty’ has incomplete type
Darwin.h:36:10: error: field ‘wall’ has incomplete type
In file included from RunDarwin.c++:33:0:
Darwin.h:35:10: error: field ‘empty’ has incomplete type
Darwin.h:36:10: error: field ‘wall’ has incomplete type
share|improve this question
2  
Use an initialisation list and define your class before the constructor. –  ta.speot.is Nov 3 '13 at 22:23
    
The latter part is in my h file. These are code snippets, I'll edit for clarity –  zaloo Nov 3 '13 at 22:25
1  
Do you get any other errors? Could it be that you don't include the header where the Species class is defined? –  juanchopanza Nov 3 '13 at 22:30
    
I definitely included the right headers, I'll put my other compiler errors in the OP. –  zaloo Nov 3 '13 at 22:36
2  
Instead of showing us snippets, why not simplify your code until you get down to the simplest version that produces the error. Chances are you'll spot the bug yourself, but otherwise you can post complete code that we can use to reproduce the error. –  Beta Nov 3 '13 at 22:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

"has incomplete type" means you haven't given the compiler the definition of Species. Without the definition, at most you can have pointers to the data, because the compiler doesn't know how much space to reserve. So it gives an error, and then ignores the line and tries to make sense of the rest of the program. Of course, because the line was ignored, trying to use it later will fail.

Note that your editor has sorted the errors by filename instead of showing you the order they actually occurred. In the future, look at the compiler output in order.

This should all be easily fixed by putting the definition (or #include) for Species before class Grid.

share|improve this answer
    
hey that worked! –  zaloo Nov 3 '13 at 22:47

You're using the syntax for static (or class) variables, but these are instance variables. Try this

Grid::Grid() {
    this->wall = Species("wall");
    this->empty = Species("empty");
    this->turn_number = 0;

etc.

share|improve this answer
    
While qualification certainly isn't necessary here, it also should still work. Sometimes using qualified names for instance members IS necessary, for example, calling the base version of an overridden member function. –  Ben Voigt Nov 3 '13 at 22:26
    
In any case, this-> also is not necessary. –  Ben Voigt Nov 3 '13 at 22:27
    
You should use the constructor initialization list here. I had already showed OP to do that, not they will get confused and develop bad habits :) –  juanchopanza Nov 3 '13 at 22:28
1  
What mistake? It's a different style than the one you showed; both are overly complicated, and both are equivalent. –  Ben Voigt Nov 3 '13 at 22:31

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