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I guess it's the thread, say A, on which the timer was created. But I can't figure out how exactly the callback function is called. Assume the timer expires, and then what happens? Does this happen when this thread gets its time slice? And if this is the case, I think the function should be called by the scheduler or what before the context is finally switched to A, then can I say A is the caller?

Thanks.

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Look up the API on MSDN. –  Martin James Nov 4 '13 at 0:42
    
Hi Martin. I've looked at the function on msdn. But in fact I want to know how OSs implement this kind of features. –  babel92 Nov 4 '13 at 0:45

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The timer callback can also be called by a pool thread, a thread that specifically manages timers or in the context of the creating thread, (the creating thread is designed to accept and process an 'Asynchronous Procedure Call'). The flag paramters in CTQT() control the action upon timer expiry.

If the timer event is called by a pool thread or timer-manager thread, that thread will become ready upon expiry and, when there is a core available to run it, it will make the callback 'immediately' within its own context. The thread that created the timer could, if it wished, wait on a synchro object, (event or semaphore), that could be signaled by the timer callback, (ie. normal inter-thread comms).

The timer callback can only be executed in the context of the thread that created it if that thread is in a position to execute the callback when it receives some sort of signal. In the case of these timers, an APC is QUEUED to the creating thread and, if that thread is blocked on one of the 'alertable' wait calls, it will become ready immediately, will run when there is a core available to run it. After the APC has run, the wait call will return. If the wait call is not SleepEx(), it will return WAIT_IO_COMPLETION - a result that is usually ignored. If the thread is not waiting when the APC is queued up, it will not be executed until the thread makes the next wait call, (obviously - since the thread must be off doing something else:).

'And if this is the case, I think the function should be called by the scheduler or what before the context is finally switched to A, then can I say A is the caller?' NO!

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Very enlightening and it may take me some time to fully understand that. Thanks a lot Martin! –  babel92 Nov 4 '13 at 21:31

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