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I have an native C++ library which makes use of a large static buffer (it acquires data from a device).

Let's say this buffer is defined like this:

unsigned char LargeBuffer[1000000];

Now I would like to expose parts of this buffer to managed C++, e.g. when 1000 bytes of new data are stored by the library at LargeBuffer[5000] I would like to perform a callback into managed C++ code, passing a pointer to LargeBuffer[5000] so that managed C++ can access the 1000 bytes of data there (directly if possibile, i.e. without copying data, to achieve maximum performance).

What is the best way to let managed C++ code access data in this native array?

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It's spelled "native" not "unmanaged" –  Terry Mahaffey Dec 29 '09 at 18:29
    
Aren't they synonyms, in this context? –  Enrico Detoma Dec 29 '09 at 20:31
    
"unmanaged" comes off as slightly pompous to native programmers –  Terry Mahaffey Dec 30 '09 at 2:03
    
I don't want to be "pompous" so I changed "unmanaged" to "native" :-) –  Enrico Detoma Dec 30 '09 at 15:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Managed C++ can access the unmanaged memory just fine. You can just pass in the pointer and use it in managed c++.

Now, if you want to then pass that data into other .NET languages, you'll need to copy that data over to managed memory structures or use unsafe code in C#

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Actually I'll have to pass back the data from managed C++ to C# so I guess I'll have to use unsafe code. –  Enrico Detoma Dec 29 '09 at 18:24
    
CLI C++ and C# mix perfectly fine, there is no need for the unsafe keyword. –  user230821 Dec 29 '09 at 18:50
    
@high6: There is if he wants to access the raw pointer from C#. –  Joe Doyle Dec 29 '09 at 18:55

As of .net 2.0 and the new IJW you should be able to access the buffer directly from CLI C++.

As long as you dont specify "#pragma unmanaged" then the code will be compiled as a form of managed which is what allows the direct access.

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Ok from C++, but if I want to access the raw pointer from C# too, I'll have to use unsafe keyword. Thanks for pointing me to IJW: I know very little about the managed-unmanaged mechanisms, now I'm understanding a bit more. –  Enrico Detoma Dec 29 '09 at 20:28

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