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I tried to encrypt my file by this way:

Encrypt:

static void encrypt(String strInput , String strOutput) throws IOException,
    NoSuchAlgorithmException,NoSuchPaddingException, InvalidKeyException {
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(strInput);
    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(strOutput);

    SecretKeySpec sks = new SecretKeySpec("MyDifficultPassw".getBytes(),
            "AES");
    Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
    cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, sks);
    CipherOutputStream cos = new CipherOutputStream(fos, cipher);
    int b;
    byte[] d = new byte[8];
    while ((b = fis.read(d)) != -1) {
        cos.write(d, 0, b);
    }
    // Flush and close streams.
    cos.flush();
    cos.close();
    fis.close();
}

and decrypt it back by:

Decrypt:

static String decrypt(String strInput) throws IOException, NoSuchAlgorithmException,
    NoSuchPaddingException, InvalidKeyException {
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(strInput);

    int endFile = strInput.length() - 4;
    String strOut = strInput.substring(0, endFile) + "xx.jpg"; 

    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(strOut);

    SecretKeySpec sks = new SecretKeySpec("MyDifficultPassw".getBytes(),
              "AES");
    Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
    cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, sks);
    CipherInputStream cis = new CipherInputStream(fis, cipher);
    int b;
    byte[] d = new byte[8];

    while ((b = cis.read(d)) != -1) {
        fos.write(d, 0, b);
    }
    fos.flush();
    fos.close();
    cis.close();
    return strOut;
}

However, the result file's size is 0 kb and when I tried to troubleshoot b = cis.read(d) in decrypt, always returns -1, also cis.available() always returns 0. Can anyone advise me which part of my code is wrong?

Note: I can ensure that the file that is going to be decrypted is always exist.

share|improve this question
    
This code actually work on my machine. Can we see the code where you call encrypt and decrypt? Maybe you are calling decrypt with the wrong parameter? –  Francis Nov 4 '13 at 6:29
    
Hmm don't think so because I only pass the filePath to both encrypt and decrypt method.. –  Rendy Nov 4 '13 at 6:42
    
Btw @Francis did you try on image too? –  Rendy Nov 4 '13 at 7:46
    
The result file can only be zero length if the input was zero length or you ignored an exception. –  EJP Nov 4 '13 at 8:59
    
The input, fis always returns length and there is no exception printed in Logcat. –  Rendy Nov 4 '13 at 9:03
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1 Answer

I believe that this problem is because you are trying to decrypt data that is not encrypted (or not properly encrypted).

In your decrypt() method, the CipherOutputStream hides all exception that the Cipher class may be throwing. See javadoc for CipherOutputStream:

Moreover, this class catches all exceptions that are not thrown by its ancestor classes.

To expose the problem, you may want to implement the cipher usage manually. Here is a quick example:

static String decrypt(String strInput) throws IOException,
    NoSuchAlgorithmException, NoSuchPaddingException,
    InvalidKeyException, IllegalBlockSizeException, BadPaddingException {

    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(strInput);

    int endFile = strInput.length() - 4;
    String strOut = strInput.substring(0, endFile) + "xx.txt"; 

    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(strOut);

    SecretKeySpec sks = new SecretKeySpec("MyDifficultPassw".getBytes(), "AES");
    Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
    cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, sks);

    int b;
    byte[] d = new byte[8];
    while ((b = fis.read(d)) != -1) {
        fos.write(cipher.update(d));
    }
    fos.write(cipher.doFinal());

    fos.flush();
    fos.close();
    fis.close();
    return strOut;
}

The algorithm you posted in your question seems to work fine for valid inputs. For example, let`s assume the following main:

public static void main(String[] argv)  {
    try {
        encrypt("test.txt", "XXX.txt");
        decrypt("XXX.txt");
    }
    catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.println(e);
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

Using this, and testing both with a text file and a JPG file, your algorithms executed flawlessly. However, when using an invalid input to the decryption algorithm, then the problem you described started to appear.

For testing, lets imagine that we make the "mistake" of trying to decrypt the file that was in clear like so (just changing the parameter passed to decrypt() in the main):

encrypt("test.txt", "XXX.txt");
decrypt("test.txt");

Then of course the padding on the input to the decrypt() method will be wrong and we should get an exception.

Using your version of decrypt()however, there is no exception. All we get is an empty file.

Using the modified version fo the decrypt() method that is shown above we get the following exception:

javax.crypto.BadPaddingException: Given final block not properly padded
javax.crypto.BadPaddingException: Given final block not properly padded
    at com.sun.crypto.provider.CipherCore.doFinal(CipherCore.java:811)
    at com.sun.crypto.provider.CipherCore.doFinal(CipherCore.java:676)
    at com.sun.crypto.provider.AESCipher.engineDoFinal(AESCipher.java:313)
    at javax.crypto.Cipher.doFinal(Cipher.java:1970)
    at MainTest.decrypt(MainTest.java:71)
    at MainTest.main(MainTest.java:21)
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Francis, I just realized that my encrypted image's size is 16 byte. Is it supposed to be like that? –  Rendy Nov 8 '13 at 2:41
    
That does not sound right. AES as a fixed block size of 128 bits, so output should always be a factor of 16 bytes. But I doubt very much that your image is so small (it would mean your original image is under 16 bytes in size). And although I am not sure what padding is used by default in the Java 7 Security Provider, if it is pkcs5 or 7 (which is likely), then even an empty input string will create an output of 16 bytes of encryption (the padding). So it may mean that your original input is empty. –  Francis Nov 8 '13 at 3:00
    
Finally I found my mistake! Actually the destination path I set as same as the source path. So that's why it gave only 16B (I guess it only read the first part of image). –  Rendy Nov 8 '13 at 4:02
    
Glad you figure it out. –  Francis Nov 8 '13 at 5:49
    
Yeah.. Thanks for your help :) –  Rendy Nov 8 '13 at 7:48
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