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As said in the book Microsoft Dynamics AX 2009 Programming: Getting Started it´s needed to put semicolons after declarations in x++:

The extra semicolon after the variable declaration is mandatory as long as the first line of code is not a keyword. The semicolon tells the compiler that variable declarations have come to an end. You cannot declare new variables after this semicolon.

(copied directly from the book, unchanged, if needed i´ll remove it)

However, when i remove the semicolon and run the job, there´s absolutely no error or problem:

static void Job1(Args _args)
{
str string1 = "STACKOVERFLOW";
;
print string1;
pause;
}

works just as

static void Job2(Args _args)
{
str string1 = "STACKOVERFLOW";

print string1;
pause;
}

Is it really needed ? should i get used to using it ?

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I was about to ask the same question when I came across msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc967415.aspx. Good question! –  Pascal Paradis Feb 18 '10 at 14:29
    
for more information: blogs.msdn.com/b/mfp/archive/2008/04/24/… –  Carlos Heuberger Feb 25 '13 at 18:31
    
Your answer is right there in the definition. "mandatory as long as the first line of code is not a keyword." print is a keyword. –  SShaheen Feb 25 '13 at 19:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It's explained rather elegantly here.

A key quote:

"The reason you need that extra semicolon is because the compiler can’t always see where the variable declarations end. If you don’t help a little, it will make a guess. And it’s not very good at guessing."

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2  
i´ve seen you´re not really into x++ and dynamics (based on your questions and answers) did you just search for it? well found! –  Marcelo Dec 29 '09 at 18:38

You only need the semicolon if the body of your code doesn't start with a keyword. In your example, your code starts with print, which is a built in keyword. If you had tried to start you code with: string1+=".COM"; you would receive an error.

Dynamics AX 2009 is the last version of AX that will require the extra semicolon. AX 6.0 should fix this: mfp's two cents: What's up with this semicolon?

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With the release of AX 2012 there is no need to put the additional semicolon after variable declaration.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa636895.aspx

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3  
Strictly speaking, this isn't true: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc641200.aspx "Starting in Microsoft Dynamics AX 2012 you rarely need to include a semicolon before the first statement in your X++ methods. However, you need the semi-colon in X++ methods that call static methods in the .NET Framework." More on it here: erptechnician.net/2012/06/30/… That is there are cases, however seldom they might be, when the semicolon is required even in AX 2012. –  10p Sep 6 '12 at 0:10

You really don't need the lovely semicolon (you don't get a compilation error) when the next word after declarations (if any) is not some keyword recognized by compilator like a type (an EDT, table, class, ...)

For example:

void method1()
{
    CustTable    custTable;

    custTable = CustTable::find("cust");
}

ERROR! as compiler can't separate the class declaration block of the start of the X++ code. When compilator reads the second line it doesn't know if custTable is a new variable or is part of the X++ code. So that, you need the extra semicolon to say the compiler where is the end of declarations (really, where is the start of X++ code).

void method1()
{
    CustTable    custTable;

    if (custTable)
    {
        // stuff happens
    }        
}

WORKS! as compiler knows that you can't declare a variable of type if (it's a reserved keyword, obviously) so it's clear that this is the beginning of X++ code and you can't declare variables after this line.

This works that way even if there is no variable declarations:

CustTable method1()
{
    custTable = CustTable::find("cust"); // custTable may exists in the context
    return custTable;
}

ERROR! custTable may be a decaration, or X++ code like that example.

CustTable method1()
{
    return CustTable::find("cust");
}

WORKS! as return can't be a declaration.

EXTRA:

void method1()
{
    info("This should work, ya?");
}

This should work (as info is not a type), isn't it? ... but it doesn't! Why? Because info is an special kernel method that will be replaced to its full name: Global::info(), first token will be Global after the precompiler replacement, and Global is a class.

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