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Please see the code below -

def add(a, b):
    print "ADDING %d + %d" % (a, b)
    return a + b

print "Let's do some math with just functions!"

age = add(float(raw_input("Add this:")), float(raw_input("To this:")))

Is there anyway, I can shorten the last line? Or, is there another way of getting user input?

Thanks

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Rather than length of the line, you may want to worry about bad input from the user (like entering a string) –  sureshvv Nov 4 '13 at 6:30
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Applying "don't repeat yourself", we can take the repeated code and make a function out of it:

def add(a, b):
    print "ADDING %d + %d" % (a, b)
    return a + b

print "Let's do some math with just functions!"

def getf(prompt_mesg):
    s = raw_input(prompt_mesg)
    return float(s)

age = add(getf("Add this:"), getf("To this:"))

And then if you want you can make the input function handle errors better. Instead of raising an exception that takes down the whole program, you can handle errors gracefully:

def getf(prompt_mesg):
    while True:
        try:
            s = raw_input(prompt_mesg)
            return float(s)
        except ValueError:
            print("Could not convert that input.  Please enter a number.")

This will loop forever until the user enters a valid input (or terminates the program).

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age = add(*(getf(s + " this:") for s in ("Add", "To"))). (SCNR) –  glglgl Nov 4 '13 at 8:53
    
Thanks for answering. Just one question. What is "floats" in return floats? Is that like a function? –  Social Coder Nov 5 '13 at 4:05
    
float is the class in Python for floating point numbers. If you pass a string value to it, you are asking Python to make a float object, using the string... This is the way to convert a string to a float in Python. s is a variable name in my code example. –  steveha Nov 5 '13 at 6:09
    
Thanks a lot. Perfect answer. –  Social Coder Nov 6 '13 at 7:27
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I see you're using p2.x. First thing - I'd recommend switching to p3.x (it has many enhancements, but in this case you'll be happy to see that raw_input() became input() and input () with evaluation is gone).

Other way to shorten this stuff is using input() instead of raw_input(). If user gives you anything that is not a number, you'll get some sort of exception at addition, if he gives you a number (float, int, whatever) - your program will work.

==EDIT==

As glglgl pointed out - second part is dangerous and warning here is appriopriate. Using input() is basically the same as eval(raw_input()). Unfortunately, I forgot about the fact, that it doesnt take locals and globals parameters like eval - if it would, you could make it safe. For real-life applications it shouldnt be used, because some rogue user could evaluate anything he wants, causing program (or even computer) to crash. For simple apps like that, I stand my ground, and keep saying that it is useful.

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Part 2 is very dangerous if used without care. I am definitely missing a warning in here... And Part 1 is optional. –  glglgl Nov 4 '13 at 8:50
    
Yes, it is dangerous, if used mindlessly. And yes, you are missing a warning, my bad. Warning appended in edit ;) –  FilipMalczak Nov 4 '13 at 9:01
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