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I am asking this in response to this answer.

I'm using an example of Variable and Var- edit Pls note I am asking where to use Var or Variable:

Class NewClass {

    private  String Variable = "";

    Public Class (String Var)
    {
        NewClass.Var = Variable;
    }
}

OR

    private  String Variable = "";

    Public Class (String Variable)
    {
        NewClass.Variable = Var; // OR WHATEVER OTHER COMBINATIONS IT MAY BE.
    }
}

Which ones are the class variables, how does this differ from the parameters and which goes where?

edit

I should add, as this was in the linked answer, but it seems people haven't looked at it:

It's particularly confusing because the parameters to the function have exactly the same names as the class variables, but Patient.ptNo is not the same variable as the parameter ptNo. (Actually, Patient.ptNo should be this.ptNo, because it belongs to this particular instance of the class. Patient.ptNo would refer to a single value that's common to all objects of type Patient.)

So when people say this.Variable = Variable I am still confused about what is what.

share|improve this question
    
OK I know I am asking BASIC questions, it's how my brain is, I have read tuts and studied it, and when I can no longer wrap my head around a basic concept I come here. When is does fall into place it does so quickly. So pls be patient, you were once learning.. OK? –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 7:17
    
That edit was not good, as I am asking if it is Var or variable, by changing it to variable it's assuming I am stating that they are both variable –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 7:20
    
I like your new username -- or should I say userphrase :-) –  Marko Topolnik Nov 4 '13 at 7:21
1  
For better help sooner, post an SSCCE. –  Andrew Thompson Nov 4 '13 at 7:23
1  
Sorry, I have no resources to do it now (on mobile, bad connection...) –  Marko Topolnik Nov 4 '13 at 7:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The class variable is the one defined by the class as a static field, and the parameter is the one defined by the method. It's just that simple. There are also instance variables (defined at the class level but not static) and local variables (defined within a method, but not as input parameters).

public class Foo {
    private static String someName; // this is a class variable
    private String someOtherName; // this is an instance variable

    public Foo(String anotherName) { // anotherName is a constructor parameter
        int yetAnother = 1; // yetAnother is a local variable
        someOtherName = "foo"; // assign a value to someOtherName
    }

These two variables are completely distinct. They don't even have to have the same type! The only complication in your example is that both variables happen to have the same name. When that happens, the compiler will favor the constructor parameter (or method parameter, or local variable) over the class variable. In order to "force" it to use the class variable, you prefix it with this..

The thing to keep in mind is that the two variables are totally separate, regardless of their names.

So this:

class NewClass {

    private  String Variable = "";

    Public NewClass (String Variable)
    {
        NewClass.Variable = Variable;
    }
}

is exactly the same as this:

class NewClass {

    private  String Variable = "";

    Public NewClass (String someOtherVariableName)
    {
        NewClass.Variable = someOtherVariableName;
    }
}

... and it's also exactly the same as this:

class NewClass {

    private  String Variable = "";

    Public NewClass (String Var)
    {
        NewClass.Variable = Var;
    }
}

The convention of using the same name for a parameter as for the class variable just means you don't have to come up with pointless variants on the variable name.

share|improve this answer
    
This is SUCH a BEAUTIFUL answer. +100.. I accepted the other answer (he only had 1 rep when he arrived and he clarified which to use where) is that OK? I'm a big softy for people with tiny reps, who do give correct answers –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 7:43
    
No worries, just happy I could help. :) –  yshavit Nov 4 '13 at 7:44
    
I feel so torn, because this is the better answer, but I accepted the other one before you had finished yours.. they should have a half hour limit on accepting answers.. I might ask that on meta –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 7:45
    
Don't worry about it, it's just 15 points. I won't lose any sleep over it! I appreciate the kind words, though. –  yshavit Nov 4 '13 at 7:45
1  
pls see this meta.stackexchange.com/questions/204129/… –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 8:02

No problem of using variable as your constructor parameter as it is the local variable for your constructor.

class NewClass {

    private  String Variable = "";

    Public NewClass (String Variable)
    {
        this.Variable = Variable;
    }
}

                       or

class NewClass {

    private  String Variable = "";

    Public NewClass (String Var)
    {
        this.Variable = Var;
    }
}

both are fine.

this.Variable denotes the current objects variable.

Try reading naming conventions.

share|improve this answer
    
beautiful so the class variable is Variable and the parameter is Var? –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 7:39
    
I accepted the other answer.. sorry, he just had so much more detail in it.. thnx for your help +1 –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 9:35

this.Variable would refer to the Variable field of the class and just Variable would be the parameter passed to the constructor.

private String Variable = ""; - This is not static

Therefore your constructor would look liek

public NewClass(String Var/iable) {
    this.Variable = Variable; // this must be used, where this.Variable is the class variable and just Variable is the constructor parameter.
}

Note: You have used the ClassName.fieldName which is allowed only for static fields of the class. It should be this.fieldName instead, if the Variable is not static. Also, Public shouldn't be in caps, the constructor name should be the Class name. The keyword class should be in small and not Class.

In case you want to use the way you've put in your code, the Variable in the class should be static. Something like this

private static String Variable = "";
public NewClass(String Var/iable) {
    NewClass.Variable = Variable; // Since Variable is static now, you use the classname to access the static field.
}

Edit: It is absolutely okay to use the same name, as long as you can differentiate them both. In this case, this.Variable would mean the class variable and just Variable would refer to the parameter which was passed to constructor while creating an instance of this class.

class Variable = Variable passed to the constructor; // This is what the below statement means
this.Variable = Variable;
share|improve this answer
    
pls see edit edit Pls note I am using var/iable where I do not know I am not sure which goes into the constructor + btw –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 7:22
1  
I want to accept your answer, I just need you to clarify ^^ –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 7:24
    
Check the edit and see if it answers your doubt. –  R.J Nov 4 '13 at 7:31
    
Thnks RJ +1, but the answer I accepted, explained it.. I didn't ask clearly enough.. people have gotten confused by my Q, so I edited it, sorry about that. and thnx again :) –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 7:41
1  
No problem, as long as you understood the concepts!:) –  R.J Nov 4 '13 at 7:43
class NewClass {

private  String variable = "";

public NewClass (String variable)
{
    this.variable = variable;
}
}

this.variable refers to current object instance. Please follow naming conventions

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think I've made myself clear in the var/variabl thing –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 7:35
    
this.Variable=Variable..... this.Variable is current object instance. whereas Variable is the constructor argument variable –  Balaji Dhanasekar Nov 4 '13 at 7:36
    
I've edited my Q as I just don't think I communicated well what I was asking sorry. –  user2776866 Nov 4 '13 at 7:40
    
No Problem as long as you are clear.. –  Balaji Dhanasekar Nov 4 '13 at 7:46

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