Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this LINQ-query:

            bool? a, b, c;

            from i in _ctx.SomeEntitySet

            where
                (a == null ? true : i.IsA == a) &&
                (b == null ? true : i.IsB == b) &&
                (c == null ? true : i.IsC == c)

            select i;

I only want to take the condition IsX == x into consideration if x != null.

Brainfreeze, please help me out...

share|improve this question
    
In general, x == a ? true : x == b is the same as x == a || x == b. –  John Feminella Dec 29 '09 at 19:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
where (a == null || i.IsA == a) &&
      (b == null || i.IsB == b) &&
      (c == null || i.IsC == c)
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, of course! Thanks. –  Mickel Dec 29 '09 at 19:32

Not sure it's any more efficient, but it reads better:

        bool? a, b, c;

        from i in _ctx.SomeEntitySet

        where
            (a == null || i.IsA == a) &&
            (b == null || i.IsB == b) &&
            (c == null || i.IsC == c)

        select i;
share|improve this answer

I think the version that you have most clearly expresses the intention. I would not change it.

Alternatives:

a == null || i.IsA == a;

!a.HasValue || i.IsA == a;

i.IsA == (a ?? i.IsA);

None of these is clearer to me, however. Don't focus on efficiency, focus on readability and expressiveness.

share|improve this answer
    
personally I think (a == null || i.IsA == a) is more readable than (a == null ? true : i.IsA == a) –  Adam Ralph Dec 29 '09 at 19:41
    
Perhaps it's more readable because it's shorter but I don't think it most clearly expresses the intent of the code. Of course, this is rather subjective. –  jason Dec 29 '09 at 19:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.