Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

.h

public:
    void doStuff() const;
private:
    struct Private;
    Private * d;

.cpp

struct XX::Private
{
    int count;
}

void XX::doStuff() const
{
    d->count = 2; // I want an error here!!
}

Do you need furher explanation?

Update:

I thought I'd do something a bit different that requires less changes to the code. I made this:

.h

template <class TPriv>
class PrivatePtr
{
    public:
        ...
        TPriv * const operator->();
        TPriv const * const operator->() const;
        ...
    private:
        TPriv * m_priv;
};

.cpp

...

template <class TPriv>
TPriv * const PrivatePtr<TPriv>::operator->()
{
    return m_priv;
}

template <class TPriv>
TPriv const * const PrivatePtr<TPriv>::operator->() const
{
    return m_priv;
}

And then use it like this:

.h

#include <PrivatePtr.h>

class DLLEXPORTMACROTHING myclass
{
    ...
    private:
        struct Private;
        PrivatePtr<Private> d;
};

.cpp

#include <PrivatePtr.cpp>

struct myclass::Private()
{
    ...
}

But this causes C4251 "myclass::d : class 'PrivatePtr' needs to have dll-interface to be used by clients of clas 'myclass'

Wait, what? I DON'T want it to be used by anyone but myclass internally... safe to ignore? I tried looking for the answer but none of the cases were close to what I have here. On the other cases it did seems like quite a bit issue.

share|improve this question
2  
I love your explanation of the problem. – Adri C.S. Nov 4 '13 at 12:19
1  
A constant pointer isn't the same as a pointer to a constant. If you want to enforce transitive constness, you should write your own pointer wrapper. – Kerrek SB Nov 4 '13 at 12:19

You can hide d behind an accessor function, and overload that based on const. Instead of accessing d directly, you then write impl()->count = 2;. impl() would return Private *, whereas impl() const would return const Private *.

share|improve this answer
    
Almost what I want. I'd still need to block direct access to the member variable. Good suggestion though! – 0xbaadf00d Nov 4 '13 at 14:03
1  
@justanothercoder Rename it to _d_dont_use_directly and hit anyone who does use it directly with a stick. :) More seriously, you could make the member variable itself const Private *, and in the non-const impl() function, use const_cast. That should prevent accidental misuse.. – hvd Nov 4 '13 at 14:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted

.h

template <class TPriv>
class PrivatePtr
{
    public:
        ...
        TPriv * const operator->();
        TPriv const * const operator->() const;
        ...
    private:
        TPriv * m_priv;
};

.cpp

...

template <class TPriv>
TPriv * const PrivatePtr<TPriv>::operator->()
{
    return m_priv;
}

template <class TPriv>
TPriv const * const PrivatePtr<TPriv>::operator->() const
{
    return m_priv;
}

And then use it like this:

.h

#include <PrivatePtr.h>

class DLLEXPORTMACROTHING myclass
{
    ...
    private:
        struct Private;
        PrivatePtr<Private> d;
};

.cpp

#include <PrivatePtr.cpp>

struct myclass::Private()
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.