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I want to do some checking in a writer accessor. My first idea was returning a boolean.

class MyClass
  def var=(var)
    @var = var
    # some checking
    return true
  end
end

m = MyClass.new
retval = (m.var = 'foo')

=> "foo"

Can I set a return value in a writer accessor? If yes, how can I get this value?

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Can you provide an example of what kind of checking? I'm a little lost by what you mean by that. But I have a hunch it's very possible, just need some clarification. –  mwilliams Oct 13 '08 at 14:10
1  
Just because something is possible doesn't mean it's a good idea. ;) –  epochwolf Oct 13 '08 at 14:12
    
Raising an exception is definitely the ruby way to do this. –  rampion Apr 8 '09 at 19:32
    
What you seem to be asking for will probably turn out to be non-intuitive and not the Ruby way. You can prove that to yourself by using your form, then using it in some code. Yeah, you'll have knowledge that you have to do things differently, but as you code you should notice whether it feels like other Ruby methods. If it doesn't feel the same then don't do it. Consistent behavior in a language is very important and extends to how we write our own code. –  the Tin Man Dec 16 '10 at 3:12
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4 Answers

I would use set_var(var) instead of what you are trying to do, an attribute writer is assumed to just work. What you are trying to do is nonstandard and non-obvious to the next poor person to use your code. (It may just be yourself) I would throw an exception if bad input is sent or something rather exceptional happens.

You want this behavior

Correct
>>temp = object.var = 7
=> 7 

Wrong
>>temp = object.var = 7
=> false

The = operator should always return the value that was passed to it. Ruby uses implicit returns which is uncommon in programming languages. Double check the returns when you use method=().

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I agree completely ;) –  Christoph Schiessl Oct 13 '08 at 14:44
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class Test
  def var=(var)
    @var = var
    return true
  end
end

t1, t2 = Test.new, Test.new

t1.var = 123 # evaluates to 123

# Why is it impossible to return something else:
t1.var = t2.var = 456

As stated in the comment: I believe it's impossible to change the return value in order to allow chained assignments. Changing the return value would probably be unexpected by the majority of Ruby programmers anyway.

Disclaimer: I tested the code above but I've found no explicit references to verify my statement.

Update

class Test
  def method_missing(method, *args)
    if method == :var=
      # check something
      @var = args[0]
      return true
    else
      super(method, *args)
    end
  end

  def var
    @var
  end
end

t = Test.new
t.var = 123 # evaluates to 123
t.does_not_exists # NoMethodError

It really seems to impossible! The above sample suggests that the return value isn't related to the var= method at all. You cannot change this behavior - it's the fundamental way how Ruby assignments work.

Update 2: Solution found

You could raise an exception!

class Test
  def var=(var)
    raise ArgumentError if var < 100 # or some other condition
    @var = var
  end
  def var
    @var
  end
end

t = Test.new
t.var = 123 # 123
t.var = 1 # ArgumentError raised
t.var # 123
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Exception raising is definitely the way to do this. –  rampion Apr 8 '09 at 19:31
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Also, per your example, to clean things up you could do the following:

class MyClass
  attr_accessor :var
end

m = MyClass.new
m.var = "Test"
puts m.var # => "Test"

In regards to your question though, are you asking if you can return a value other than what you set for the value of the object?

Update

Check out this project: Validatable. It adds ActiveRecord like validations to your class attributes.

Quick scenario:

class Person
  include Validatable
  validates_presence_of :name
  attr_accessor :name
end

class PersonPresenter
  include Validatable
  include_validations_for :person
  attr_accessor :person

  def initialize(person)
    @person = person
  end
end

presenter = PersonPresenter.new(Person.new)
presenter.valid? #=> false
presenter.errors.on(:name) #=> "can't be blank"
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I need some checking before I save the value, which is why I'm not using attr_accessor. Yes, you understood my question. A better question might be "how should the class respond to an invalid value?" –  Christian Lescuyer Oct 13 '08 at 14:25
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I know this is a late response to the party...

It's hard to know what you are attempting to do with the class. You mentioned wanting to check it before saving... to a database? file?

What would you like to happen in the case of a bad attribute value?

By using a boolean return, you effectively "hide" the error (because you will forget about the weird thing of having to check the return value of a setter).

While you can do what others suggested

  • Use Validator plugin
  • Raise an error

You can also consider an isValid? method like many classes that end up getting persisted do. Then the save can check the state of the object and throw an error.

Bottom line:

  • Don't do what you posted
  • Do throw an error (by any of the posted solutions)

One way to help drive the solution is to consider writing the behavior you are looking for first (i.e., BDD). Then, work your way further into what the class should do by TDD -ing using RSpec to get the desired class "contract" that needs to emerge to support the desired behavior.

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Thanks for your answer. It does seem a bad idea now, so I've probably learned something in Ruby since then ;-) –  Christian Lescuyer Dec 17 '10 at 15:51
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