Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It seems my browsers has a default margin set on the <body> element and thus if some element E ( declared inside the body element ) has a margin of 10px, E will be removed from the edges of browser by distance = body_Margin + 10px.

a) Assuming we also have an element B, which is absolutely positioned:

   #B
   {
      position:absolute;
      width:150px;
      top:128px;
      right:0px;
      margin:0px;
   }

then I would expect that B would be removed from the right edge of a browser by a distance of 10px, but instead B ignores the default margin of a body element and thus its distance is 0px. Why is that?

b)

body 
{
    background-color: blue;
    margin:70px;
}

Since body element has a margin of 70px, then due to margins being transparent ( and thus they don’t have the same background color as their element ), I would expect the edges of the browser window to have white color, but instead they have same color as the body element ( blue )?!

share|improve this question
1  
This is not a question –  Josh Stodola Dec 29 '09 at 20:31
    
Please accept an answer if you found it useful –  Gabriel McAdams Apr 27 '11 at 18:55

2 Answers 2

The poster is asking why the element B is not effected by the margin of the body element.

Quoted from the question:

... I would expect that B would be removed from the right edge of a browser by a distance of 10px, but instead B ignores the default margin of a body element and thus its distance is 0px. Why is that?

The answer is this:

Read this page from w3schools on position. It says the following:

Absolute: Generates an absolutely positioned element, positioned relative to the first parent element that has a position other than static.

When you absolutely positioned your element (B), you removed it from the normal flow of the document. Because all of its parent elements (all the way up to the body of your document) are set to static (default), their margins are ignored.

You can either set the position of the body to relative (I would be careful with this - it could effect other elements as well), or you could change the right of B from:

right:0px;

to:

right:10px;
share|improve this answer
    
-1 If you nest a position:absolute element within a position:relative element you will see that you are very wrong. –  Josh Stodola Dec 29 '09 at 23:43
    
That said, if what you believe the poster is asking is correct, then the answer would be to apply position:relative to the <body> element. –  Josh Stodola Dec 29 '09 at 23:45
    
Remember to accept this answer if you found it useful. –  Gabriel McAdams Dec 31 '09 at 0:08
    
@Josh: The poster only asked WHY it was ignoring the margin of the body element. None the less, I changed my answer to reflect your comments. –  Gabriel McAdams Jan 4 '10 at 17:33

While I agree this is not a question, given the difference in browsers it is generally acceptable to have:

html, body {
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
}

...in your CSS to make sure you have full control. Why browsers do what they do ? I'll leave that to others to speculate.

share|improve this answer
    
uhm, I'm not sure why you think those aren't questions. Question a) clearly asks why element B ignores the default margin..., while question b) also indirectly asks why edges of a browser window don't have a white color. –  carewithl Dec 29 '09 at 23:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.