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Based on this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/19765782/1606345

#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct {
    int *arr1;
    int *arr2;
} myStruct;

myStruct *allocMyStruct(int num)
{
    myStruct *p;

    if ((p = malloc(sizeof *p +
                 10 * sizeof *p->arr1 +
                 10 * num * sizeof *p->arr2)) != NULL)
    {
        p->arr1 = (int *)(p + 1);
        p->arr2 = p->arr1 + 10;
    }
    return p;
}

void initMyStruct(myStruct * a, int num)
{
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) a->arr1[i] = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < 10 * num; i++) a->arr2[i] = -1;
}

int main (void)
{
    int num = 3;

    myStruct *a = allocMyStruct(num);
    initMyStruct(a, num);
    free(a);
    return 1;
}

It is safe to assign p->arr1 to the address of (p + 1)?

p->arr1 = (int *)(p + 1);
share|improve this question
3  
You might be getting hit by memory alignment issues? –  Chris O Nov 4 '13 at 13:01
3  
In his case, no, this code looks "fine" –  benjarobin Nov 4 '13 at 13:15
2  
@art: If it's quite common, I take it the p+1, in combination with the cast won't cause issues depending on the platform on which you compile this code? I mean: 32bit pointers take up 4 bytes, whereas 64bit ptrs require 8 bytes... That's what I'm unsure about, anyways... –  Elias Van Ootegem Nov 4 '13 at 13:46
1  
p+1 gives you a pointer that has good enough alignment to address a myStruct (in this case). It's somewhere between hard and impossible to invent alignment requirements where the pointer to a struct has lower alignment restrictions than any of the struct members. So in that case it's pretty much impossible for the pointer to be misaligned for an int unless int has higher alignment requirements than an int * which I find hard to believe. There might be weird architectures out there where this can happen but I don't know of any. Theoretically possible? maybe. In practice? just fine. –  Art Nov 4 '13 at 14:21
1  
@Art: I've been digging around a bit. It does indeed seem very unlikely that p+1 would cause trouble, though there's no real guarantee. p+1 should give the next pointer, and so it shout "shift" 4 or 8 bytes, depending on architecture. Although, there's no guarantee, but on 99.999... + IEEE 754 rounding error % of machines, this is not going to be a problem. –  Elias Van Ootegem Nov 4 '13 at 14:49

1 Answer 1

You have a fundamental problem here in how you are thinking about struct allocation. When you malloc a struct, you malloc the sizeof that struct, you don't malloc for the arrays it will contain, those need to be allocated separately. To do this your code should look more like:

myStruct *allocMyStruct(int num)
{
    myStruct *p = malloc( sizeof( myStruct ) );

    if( p != NULL )
    {
        p->arr1 = malloc( sizeof( int ) * 10 ); // p->arr1 now points to an array of 10 elements
        p->arr2 = malloc( sizeof( int ) * 10 * num ); // p->arr2 now points to an array of 10 * num elements
    }
    return p;
}

Keep in mind when you free this you will need to free the arrays individually as well so if your pointer the myStruct was a:

free( a->arr1 );
free( a->arr2 );
free( a );
share|improve this answer
3  
The OP does allocate enough memory in this one call to malloc(). You might like to take a 2nd look. –  alk Nov 4 '13 at 13:23
    
The OP is trying an optimization, where all memory are allocated in one piece instead of using separate allocation. The arr1/arr2 pointers are adjusted to point into that memory. That's a perfectly valid thing to do - but you'll have to care about alignment. –  nos Nov 4 '13 at 13:25
    
@nos: Where exactly do you see the possible problem(s) with alignment? –  alk Nov 4 '13 at 13:27
2  
@alk in this case there is probably none - but in the general case you'd have to think about it. –  nos Nov 4 '13 at 13:28
1  
@JonathanMee: Which "misbehaviour" are you referring to please? Theres is exactly one allocation int the OP's code which's return value is passed to free() - this will work perfectly fine. –  alk Nov 4 '13 at 13:48

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